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[#] Sun May 24 2020 15:33:07 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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I don't think Alpine is ready for prime-time on the desktop (it uses a ground-up reimplementation of libc, which has had compatibility issues at times, so arguably it is not Linux in the traditional sense) but it is a good fit for certain Dockerized workloads.

[#] Sun May 24 2020 15:34:59 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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WSL 2 is little more than a VM, and if I'm going to run a VM, I might

as well run real Linux.

And one that moves you onto HyperV at that, with all the implications thereof for your Windows host. It might not be the best if you like to run games, although that may not be as true as it used to be as Microsoft has begun to enable it by default.

[#] Mon May 25 2020 13:58:21 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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I thought Docker was actually the intended use of Alpine. I've used it once or twice, but as you pointed out, it's often missing some little thing that you need to finish the container. For that purpose I switched to minideb, which works pretty well, and when it doesn't you can just switch to full-fat Debian without having to rework the entire Dockerfile. Although now that Bitnami is owned by VMware they may screw it all up by trying to merge it with Photon.

[#] Mon Jun 08 2020 10:23:50 EDT from nonservator @ Uncensored

Subject: What in the actual fuck

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GNOME 3.36.2:

 

"Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the development team also re-enabled support for the TLS 1.0 and 1.1 protocols in the glib-networking component."

 



[#] Tue Jun 09 2020 17:35:45 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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What the actual fuck, indeed.

[#] Thu Jun 11 2020 12:57:00 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

Subject: Re: What in the actual fuck

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I can't even come up with a lame rationale for that.

[#] Sat Jun 13 2020 08:59:20 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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maybe something was broken and there was not enough manpower to get a proper fix? who the actualfuck knows.

[#] Sat Jun 13 2020 09:00:02 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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PCI compliant sites are not supposed to be using TLS1.0 anymore. I'm not even sure 1.1 is legit these days, I'd have to check.

[#] Sat Jul 04 2020 14:13:23 EDT from lol @ Uncensored

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Sun May 24 2020 15:33:07 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

I don't think Alpine is ready for prime-time on the desktop (it uses a ground-up reimplementation of libc, which has had compatibility issues at times, so arguably it is not Linux in the traditional sense) but it is a good fit for certain Dockerized workloads.

It uses musllibc, which is quite awesome as it allows full static linking. We never had problems with it.



[#] Sun Jul 05 2020 10:28:44 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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In the past there were some widespread, well-documented compatibility issues between python modules and musllibc. For a while, python on Alpine had to disable the binary download mechanism for Python packages and force everything to be recompiled locally. That appears to have been done away with, but the fact remains it's a different implementation. DNS lookups also behave a bit differently, I hear, and although this conforms to the letter of the RFC's I've heard it can be unhelpful at times. I'd be wary of running it in a use-case where it was expected to have broad, generalized compatibility with the entire Linux ecosystem, but it's great for containers.

[#] Sun Jul 05 2020 15:05:28 EDT from lol @ Uncensored

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It always depends on the use case. If you want to target a broad range of embedded systems glibc will be a pain up the a* because it does not allow full static linking. For instance we can successfully execute some of our binaries on android devices and other SoC based systems.



[#] Sun Jul 05 2020 19:31:32 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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I wasn't sure what you meant by that, so I ran a quick test on Ubuntu 18.04:

$ gcc -static hello.c -o hello
$ ldd ./hello
not a dynamic executable
$ file hello
hello: ELF 64-bit LSB executable, x86-64, version 1 (GNU/Linux), statically linked, for GNU/Linux 3.2.0, BuildID[sha1]=27d3d47a630b097110f0f432f28109b609c6b5d5, not stripped

[#] Sun Jul 05 2020 19:32:42 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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(After the quick test, I'm still not sure what you mean by that. Maybe applies only to ARM/Android?)

[#] Mon Jul 06 2020 13:07:37 EDT from lol @ Uncensored

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If you depend on getaddrinfo or iconv (which you will quite fast when using other 3rd party libraries) you will run into troubles. 



[#] Mon Jul 06 2020 13:16:57 EDT from lol @ Uncensored

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If your application uses for instance getaddrinfo and you compile with -static gcc will give you a big warning, that you will only be able to execute this binary on systems with the exact same glibc version. (It will use dlopen to load needed libraries even tho its is statically linked)



[#] Tue Jul 07 2020 15:52:08 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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Ahh yes. Probably because of nsswitch.conf

[#] Wed Jul 08 2020 09:37:44 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Ooooh I remember that issue. The way I remember it is that if the name service switch used a library of some sort and your program used a different version of the same library, the program would crash as soon as it made a call to getaddrinfo() or a similar function.

Once again, this is a reason people are putting things into containers now.

[#] Sat Jul 11 2020 07:45:38 EDT from lol @ Uncensored

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Yeah, but containers are not avaiable for every platform, thats why working with musl is quite cool :) You can for instance compile GUI programs with fltk, completely statically link the X11 stack and execute it then on a generic android device. There are some X11 servers for android out there to display your program.



[#] Mon Aug 03 2020 17:39:54 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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This is true, and to that end I'd be very interested in learning the techniques used by third-party software publishers when they have "the Linux version" of a program.

In other news [ https://tinyurl.com/y4krklpr ] from the "well obviously" department, India Business Machines, the former technology company, has started swinging the axe in the Red Hat department. Apparently they're doing a reasonable job keeping it quiet, but if you go looking, the reports are that "typical IBM" behavior is happening. Red Hat's culture is being replaced by IBM's, their patented breed of Manager Cancer is creeping in everywhere, layoffs are happening in Raleigh, and hiring is happening in India.

If you're still relying on Red Hat, CentOS, or Fedora ... "do the needful" and switch to something else while you have the time to do it at a relaxed pace. Fedora is reportedly "increasingly being left out of the loop" so its utility as an unofficial prequel to RHEL is probably not going to happen for much longer. CentOS is nice because it's basically just a respin of RHEL with the branding and proprietary bits removed, but how much longer will Big Blue allow that?

Thankfully, the Linux world will adapt, as it always does...

[#] Sun Aug 09 2020 03:16:14 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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I've been running Ubuntu for a long time now...

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