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[#] Wed Mar 31 2021 10:38:21 EDT from LoanShark

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Could just be that AZ doesn't include the sleeves, which were New York's decision (and frankly a bit of silliness)

Thanks for the firsthand info IG.. I just wanted to clarify the differences between the EDL.

[#] Wed Mar 31 2021 14:19:06 EDT from ParanoidDelusions

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It could be. I can't find any definitive answer if all Real IDs contain RFID chips or not. But, this is an interesting link: 


https://constitutionalalliance.org/real-id-exposed-it-is-worse-than-you-think/
 

 

Wed Mar 31 2021 10:38:21 EDT from LoanShark

Could just be that AZ doesn't include the sleeves, which were New York's decision (and frankly a bit of silliness)

Thanks for the firsthand info IG.. I just wanted to clarify the differences between the EDL.

 



[#] Sat Apr 03 2021 11:40:12 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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I'd be interested in knowing whether it's possible for civilians to scan the ID chip. Obviously we don't have access to the massive databases that the government has, but it seems like it would be useful just to receive a block of binary sludge that is guaranteed to be unique and consistent, essentially a fingerprint of the ID, that civilian systems could use simply to be able to say "yes, I've seen that ID before and here it is again."

A scan of that type, combined with a biometric ID collected *locally* by whoever is using it, would be able to replace a lot of redundant cards in the typical wallet. Perhaps not anything tied to financial resources, but things like door keys.

I don't know much about how an RFID chip works. Does it output a static blob of data every time, or does it answer a public key challenge, or something else?

[#] Sat Apr 03 2021 11:51:01 EDT from ParanoidDelusions

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What I read makes it sound like this is possible, in exactly the context you describe. 

 

Sat Apr 03 2021 11:40:12 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar
I'd be interested in knowing whether it's possible for civilians to scan the ID chip. Obviously we don't have access to the massive databases that the government has, but it seems like it would be useful just to receive a block of binary sludge that is guaranteed to be unique and consistent, essentially a fingerprint of the ID, that civilian systems could use simply to be able to say "yes, I've seen that ID before and here it is again."

A scan of that type, combined with a biometric ID collected *locally* by whoever is using it, would be able to replace a lot of redundant cards in the typical wallet. Perhaps not anything tied to financial resources, but things like door keys.

I don't know much about how an RFID chip works. Does it output a static blob of data every time, or does it answer a public key challenge, or something else?

 



[#] Sat Apr 03 2021 12:17:00 EDT from Nurb432

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I dont see why reading it would be anything other than trivial as readers are a dime a dozen.   That said, the data might be encrypted so what you get may be pointless. ( it should be encrypted, but you know how things goes these days. Lots of dropped security balls )

Sat Apr 03 2021 11:40:12 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar
I'd be interested in knowing whether it's possible for civilians to scan the ID chip. Obviously we don't have access to the massive databases that the government has, but it seems like it would be useful just to receive a block of binary sludge that is guaranteed to be unique and consistent, essentially a fingerprint of the ID, that civilian systems could use simply to be able to say "yes, I've seen that ID before and here it is again."

A scan of that type, combined with a biometric ID collected *locally* by whoever is using it, would be able to replace a lot of redundant cards in the typical wallet. Perhaps not anything tied to financial resources, but things like door keys.

I don't know much about how an RFID chip works. Does it output a static blob of data every time, or does it answer a public key challenge, or something else?

 



[#] Sat Apr 03 2021 13:30:48 EDT from zooer

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Did you get your pets chipped?

I don't know how much security there is, but I am sure that the codes are similar to a UPC. Leading digits represent the application or a manufacture, the rest is a unique ID.



[#] Sat Apr 03 2021 13:54:17 EDT from Nurb432

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I did.  I dont those are encrypted.   It only gives you an ID number, does not tell you owner details.  You have to go to the people who mange the chip for that.

Sat Apr 03 2021 13:30:48 EDT from zooer

Did you get your pets chipped?

I don't know how much security there is, but I am sure that the codes are similar to a UPC. Leading digits represent the application or a manufacture, the rest is a unique ID.



 



[#] Sat Apr 03 2021 14:51:54 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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My cats are chipped. That data is, by design, nothing more than a simple string of data that is a key into a public database ... and that's the *perfect* example of what I am asking about, with regard to the ability to use a REAL-ID as an opaque but unique blob of data. I don't know if the pet owner database (screw you, PETA; they're pets and I own them) is accessible to the general public; you may have to register as a veteranarian or an animal shelter or something. So I can't easily read the tag and have it pop up "this cat's name is Sprite and he belongs to IGnatius T Foobar at 3xxx Gxxxx Street in Xxxxx Xxxxx".

But I *do* have an RFID-controlled pet door (which I reviewed at https://youtu.be/453tFCCLzQA if you care to see it) that only unlocks for the animals who live here. They are enrolled by scanning their chips, and it opens only for those chips. In this application, the software doesn't need to access the database; it only needs to confirm that the chip belongs to one of the two animals that are enrolled in the system; it only needs to confirm that the RFID matches one that has been scanned in before. It doesn't need to know the data's *meaning*.

If the REAL-ID chip works the same way, then I can see plenty of (legitimate) applications that don't require decryption or access to the database; they only need a guarantee that every read of the same chip is consistent and that the data it reads is globally unique.

(Anyone who wants to comment about mass surveillance, don't bother unless you also don't carry a cell phone.)

[#] Sat Apr 03 2021 16:34:54 EDT from zooer

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When I first adopted my cat, the cat ran off, he was returned because of his chip  The cat was picked up by animal control, dropped off at the shelter, the shelter called the chip company and the chip company called us.

The people reading the chip do not have access to the database.

 



[#] Sat Apr 03 2021 18:41:35 EDT from Nurb432

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Here the state police are partnering with private businesses to have access to their security cams. And there are countless city owned cameras on nearly every stop light. Im sure the state has access to that, and vice-versa 

Even if you dont carry a phone and go dark, if you are anywhere near civilization, they know where you are. In real time. Our State IDs here are setup for facial recognition. No glasses, cant smile. etc.

 

Anyone remember the Boston bomber?  Where they tracked down his movements for the last week or so prior using various security cams, even ATM cameras.. and that was what, 15+ years ago? They were looking for possible co-conspirators that got away ( at least i think it was him, if not it was a similar event )

Sat Apr 03 2021 14:51:54 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

(Anyone who wants to comment about mass surveillance, don't bother unless you also don't carry a cell phone.)

 



[#] Sat Apr 03 2021 22:31:37 EDT from zooer

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Sat Apr 03 2021 06:41:35 PM EDT from Nurb432

Anyone remember the Boston bomber?  Where they tracked down his movements for the last week or so prior using various security cams, even ATM cameras.. and that was what, 15+ years ago? They were looking for possible co-conspirators that got away ( at least i think it was him, if not it was a similar event )

 

Eight years ago, 2013.

 

Enemy of the State a 1998 film about government surveillance of the people.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enemy_of_the_State_(film)

Gene Hackman who was in the movie was in a surveillance movie in 1974  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Conversation

Government surveillance has always been a thing.  

  



[#] Sun Apr 04 2021 08:17:00 EDT from Nurb432

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8, 15.. same difference :)  

 

Kidding aside, still long enough ago that you know whatever they could do then is 1000x more now. And yes. its always been there, but now with tech and cooperation from small mom-and-pop shops.. even worse than we could imagine.

Sat Apr 03 2021 22:31:37 EDT from zooer

 

Sat Apr 03 2021 06:41:35 PM EDT from Nurb432

Anyone remember the Boston bomber?  Where they tracked down his movements for the last week or so prior using various security cams, even ATM cameras.. and that was what, 15+ years ago? They were looking for possible co-conspirators that got away ( at least i think it was him, if not it was a similar event )

 

Eight years ago, 2013.

 

Enemy of the State a 1998 film about government surveillance of the people.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enemy_of_the_State_(film)

Gene Hackman who was in the movie was in a surveillance movie in 1974  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Conversation

Government surveillance has always been a thing.  

  



 



[#] Sun Apr 04 2021 14:35:21 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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And they ridiculed Scott McNealy all those years ago when he said "You have no privacy. Get over it."

[#] Sun Apr 04 2021 18:53:03 EDT from zooer

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There was a murder in a town not too far away.  Two of the tools they used was the EZpass records, and the murder suspect put the person's address into their vehicle's GPS system.  They searched the history of his truck.



[#] Mon Apr 05 2021 11:00:23 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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Speaking of online services that need to be shut down, preferably using explosives:

[ https://www.zdnet.com/article/facebook-data-on-533-million-users-posted-online/ ]

Anyone still stupid enough to use Facebook now has all of their personal data including phone numbers, facebook IDs, full names, birth dates, and other information cheerfully made available to all of the cybercriminals of the world.

[#] Mon Apr 05 2021 13:49:30 EDT from Nurb432

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I use it due to family.

My birthday is not accurate.  Its my short name, not 'legal name'. They dont have my phone number. My job is 'shield field agent', not my real job.  Any image i post is a screenshot of the image, so no geo-codes. Sure they have other bits and pieces but far more damaging stuff is out there from other breaches. They are the least of my concern to be honest. 

Mon Apr 05 2021 11:00:23 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar
Speaking of online services that need to be shut down, preferably using explosives:

[ https://www.zdnet.com/article/facebook-data-on-533-million-users-posted-online/ ]

Anyone still stupid enough to use Facebook now has all of their personal data including phone numbers, facebook IDs, full names, birth dates, and other information cheerfully made available to all of the cybercriminals of the world.

 



[#] Mon Apr 05 2021 15:37:48 EDT from zooer

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A screenshot from your phone will send your phone's exif data information.

If you're a Linux guy, use "jhead" to remove the information on jpg images.
https://www.sentex.ca/~mwandel/jhead/

 

 



[#] Mon Apr 05 2021 16:43:06 EDT from Nurb432

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I dont use my phone with their service.

Mon Apr 05 2021 15:37:48 EDT from zooer

A screenshot from your phone will send your phone's exif data information.

If you're a Linux guy, use "jhead" to remove the information on jpg images.
https://www.sentex.ca/~mwandel/jhead/

 

 



 



[#] Mon Apr 05 2021 19:06:36 EDT from darknetuser

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2021-04-05 11:00 from IGnatius T Foobar
Speaking of online services that need to be shut down, preferably using

explosives:

[
https://www.zdnet.com/article/facebook-data-on-533-million-users-posted

-online/ ]

Anyone still stupid enough to use Facebook now has all of their
personal data including phone numbers, facebook IDs, full names, birth

dates, and other information cheerfully made available to all of the

cybercriminals of the world.



I mentioned it to some facebook user and the answer I got is that he didn't care.

I feel the need to hunt for the data dump and screw this guy. People as stupid as this one has it comming. Do you know where can I get the datadump? :P

[#] Mon Apr 05 2021 21:21:17 EDT from zooer

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People no longer care, that is a problem.

 

As far as vaccine passports, Fauci says US will not require COVID-19 ‘vaccine passports’, so that most likely means it is in the works.



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