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[#] Sat Aug 21 2021 11:54:27 EDT from LoanShark

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Without permissiveness, everything is moralizing.

[#] Sat Aug 21 2021 17:42:49 EDT from Nurb432

Subject: Re: Pegasus

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Agreed, but some of us dont need a deity to be moral. Just treat people as you want to be treated. Its how i live my life. ( but dont want to go too far down that path in this room.   im trying to be good :) ) 

Sat Aug 21 2021 11:20:08 AM EDT from IGnatius T Foobar Subject: Re: Pegasus

Without morality, everything is permitted.



 



[#] Sun Aug 22 2021 00:46:19 EDT from test2

Subject: Re: Pegasus

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thanks,  i've read all the old posts...

 

 

Sat Aug 21 2021 05:42:49 PM EDT from Nurb432 Subject: Re: Pegasus

Agreed, but some of us dont need a deity to be moral. Just treat people as you want to be treated. Its how i live my life. ( but dont want to go too far down that path in this room.   im trying to be good :) ) 

Sat Aug 21 2021 11:20:08 AM EDT from IGnatius T Foobar Subject: Re: Pegasus

Without morality, everything is permitted.



 



 



[#] Mon Aug 23 2021 04:15:25 EDT from darknetuser

Subject: Re: Pegasus

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2021-08-21 17:42 from Nurb432
Subject: Re: Pegasus
Agreed, but some of us dont need a deity to be moral. Just treat
people as you want to be treated. Its how i live my life. ( but dont
want to go too far down that path in this room.   im trying to be
good :) ) 

Does that mean that if you are a masochist, you get to tie people to a post and flail them while telling them they have been bad and deserve a punishment?

[#] Mon Aug 23 2021 08:07:16 EDT from Nurb432

Subject: Re: Pegasus

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No. 

Mon Aug 23 2021 04:15:25 AM EDT from darknetuser Subject: Re: Pegasus
Does that mean that if you are a masochist, you get to tie people to a post and flail them while telling them they have been bad and deserve a punishment?

 



[#] Tue Aug 24 2021 02:52:12 EDT from ParanoidDelusions

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So speaking of security... 

I did a 6 day gig, several 12-13 hour days, minimum 8 hours/day pay baseline IT Crisis Mitigation gig last week in Northern California. 

My boss here in Arizona used it as an opportunity to fire me despite our agreement at the start that I needed a very flexible, part time gig. 

I made more in an hour than I make in a day at his job. I've paid off my car until Feb of 2022 and have enough left over to make the payments again each month through that period. 

It was an opportunity to make nearly $2000 a day, helping out a person I am professional friends with, who needed someone he could trust, in my home stomping grounds, with all expenses paid, meals and 5 star hotel rooms, upgraded mid-sized rental car, San Jose, Santa Cruz, Stockton, Vacaville, Sacramento... Business class airfare there and back and the opportunity to see my friends and family over the weekend and eat at places I love that aren't anywhere else but where I grew up... 

While making more in a day than I make in a month at this dude's job. 

And he was so upset by this that he let me go - when I would have been back today, ready to continue to do things for him for a fraction of what I *can* bill for those services. 

So today instead of going into his warehouse - I started drinking at 7:30 AM and posting pictures of myself in my pool on Facebook with captions like, "this didn't really turn out that bad... I think I'd rather be doing this today knowing that I'm financially solid for the next 6 to 8 months..." 

Small entrepreneurs baffle me. They tend to be hyper-focused on very near-term issues to the point of losing the big picture - often to their own detriment. 


Anyhow, the gig was super rewarding - both financially and professionally. I really, really like crisis response. I *hate* the day to day Maytag Repairman grind of dealing with general IT operations and constant office politics with the executive staff who wonders, "Why do we have so many IT people just sitting around playing on Facebook all day?!?" This was a different office every day, coming in and tearing into machines, working against the clock to overcome new challenges that were frustrating and interesting. Making something broken work again and basically being the hero instead of the one taking the beating for "not doing my job." 

Inevitably they make cuts, focusing on the near-term bottom line, not realizing that IT staff with "not enough work to do," most often means they've done their job. Then when they are short staffed, the IT staff works incessantly on a tighter budget to keep the systems safe and supported and inevitably they fail... 


Then they hire some outside consultant for outrageous money to come in and fix what they were to cheap to pay for up front. 

 

So, large corporations don't really do any better I guess. Maybe the thing to do is to be the outside consultant and only work once everything blows up and there are interesting and engaging things to do and it means long, hard hours getting them done on a tight schedule. I suppose there is a lot less stability - but regular IT work gets me biting my own neck. 


And all outsourcing does it shift it to someone outside of your organization. The cost still gets passed on, the failures and breaches still happen - the outside specialists get called in, the work backs up, the business flow is disrupted just the same. 

You're just paying someone else outside of your company to handle it and make it FEEL more transparent. They've still got to make enough to cover those inevitable scenarios - so it is built in to your upfront costs. 

 





[#] Tue Aug 24 2021 17:40:02 EDT from Nurb432

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I passed up a Linux/security gig once out in Colorado   3x my current salary.   The 'it guy' was a good friend of mine and they were branching out into Linux and away from windows, for cost/security/performance. This was late 90s.

I didnt want to move, and liked where i was at.  The move, after it was all done, i didnt even need to be there often. Short sighted on my part.  Remote in for management, hire a monkey to rack new servers.  Fly in when things dont work right, and to check in on things.

They were making so much money they could not spend it all.  They were a streaming service, that did on-site filming of their product.    I guess he had to go on-set often while they were filming, and help with tech issues with cameras and stuff.  Took a toll on him, and couple of years later he 'found god' and left. Would have left me as IT director with endless budget.  Would not have bothered me in the slightest, i kick myself for not taking him up on the offer.

No, it was not Netflix, and you can can guess what industry it was. Not for everone, but it was legal.



[#] Wed Aug 25 2021 19:06:20 EDT from ParanoidDelusions

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Sacramento Restauranteur "Randy Paragary" recently passed away at 71. 

In my early 20s, he was just starting his restaurant empire. He had Paragary's, Cafe Bernardo, and was opening up a Mexican themed place called El Centro. He was the first wave of San Francisco cuisine putting Sacramento on the Foody map as a city with world class city night life. 

And he came to me to get him cheap computers for his places. Anyhow, I ended this trip in his downtown Hilton hotel property. 

But back then, on opening night of El Centro, things went WAY off the rails and their system ended up fucked. His manager threatened to ruin me. He was pissed at me. 

I backed out on doing business with him. After he cooled off, he came back to me and said that he over-reacted - his manager over-reacted - they wanted to keep doing business with me. I told him, "You're a big fish in a real rough ocean, and I'm a guppy in a bowl on a shelf. It isn't safe for me to do business with you." 

Lately I've wondered if I stuck with him, where he might have taken me. 

But you know... I was young, I didn't have a lot to lose immediately, but the threat of ending up in a place where I'd *never* have anything to lose was a very real consideration. I went for a more conservative career path with less risk and less reward. 

I'd probably do the same again, if I were back in the exact same situation today. 

 

Tue Aug 24 2021 17:40:02 EDT from Nurb432

I passed up a Linux/security gig once out in Colorado   3x my current salary.   The 'it guy' was a good friend of mine and they were branching out into Linux and away from windows, for cost/security/performance. This was late 90s.

I didnt want to move, and liked where i was at.  The move, after it was all done, i didnt even need to be there often. Short sighted on my part.  Remote in for management, hire a monkey to rack new servers.  Fly in when things dont work right, and to check in on things.

They were making so much money they could not spend it all.  They were a streaming service, that did on-site filming of their product.    I guess he had to go on-set often while they were filming, and help with tech issues with cameras and stuff.  Took a toll on him, and couple of years later he 'found god' and left. Would have left me as IT director with endless budget.  Would not have bothered me in the slightest, i kick myself for not taking him up on the offer.

No, it was not Netflix, and you can can guess what industry it was. Not for everone, but it was legal.



 



[#] Wed Aug 25 2021 19:29:26 EDT from Nurb432

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Yes, this has burnt me more than once, and not just career. And yes, i also did not learn and would be doomed to repeat.

I did some really stupid things when i was young, and i got lucky.  Since then the 'safe' path has been my choice.

Wed Aug 25 2021 07:06:20 PM EDT from ParanoidDelusions

 I went for a more conservative career path with less risk and less reward. I'd probably do the same again, if I were back in the exact same situation today. 

 

 



[#] Thu Aug 26 2021 12:18:42 EDT from ParanoidDelusions

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On the other hand, I could have launched a successful business on the coat-tails of a guy who ended up owning a Hilton property, among a lot of other things. 

No balls, no glory. 

 

Wed Aug 25 2021 19:29:26 EDT from Nurb432

Yes, this has burnt me more than once, and not just career. And yes, i also did not learn and would be doomed to repeat.

I did some really stupid things when i was young, and i got lucky.  Since then the 'safe' path has been my choice.

Wed Aug 25 2021 07:06:20 PM EDT from ParanoidDelusions

 I went for a more conservative career path with less risk and less reward. I'd probably do the same again, if I were back in the exact same situation today. 

 

 



 



[#] Thu Aug 26 2021 16:51:01 EDT from Nurb432

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I have heard it more than once, if you dont take chances of losing it all, with no safety net you will never really make it big. 

 

Thu Aug 26 2021 12:18:42 PM EDT from ParanoidDelusions


No balls, no glory. 

 



[#] Fri Aug 27 2021 11:17:49 EDT from ParanoidDelusions

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I mean, there was significant risk in our movie to Ohio - and we ultimately lost $100k on that move. But in the long run, because of that choice, we came out far ahead. For now. 

It doesn't mean to just rush in way over your head and start swinging blindly hoping to get lucky, though. You use some strategy and planning and carefully put it all on the line.

I don't think you risk "losing it all" - either. You risk "ending up where you started." 

Like most adages or idioms - people twist it to justify *bad* decisions. The corollary to "The bigger the risk, the bigger the reward is," 

The more you put on the table, the more likely you are to lose it. 



Thu Aug 26 2021 16:51:01 EDT from Nurb432

I have heard it more than once, if you dont take chances of losing it all, with no safety net you will never really make it big. 

 

Thu Aug 26 2021 12:18:42 PM EDT from ParanoidDelusions


No balls, no glory. 

 



 



[#] Sun Aug 29 2021 19:31:34 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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Here in New York if you are young and uncommitted and have decent IT talent, the thing to do is work IT for a financial firm. Big, small, or in between, doesn't matter. They work you to the bone and pay you stupidly good money.
Most people who go this route burn out in about ten years. So if you're smart enough, you do the ten years and invest the money properly, then you can settle down and get married and have a really good financial base while working a more sustainable career.

It wasn't my path, as I already had a fiancee and a job offer waiting for me when I graduated. But it would have been interesting.

[#] Sun Aug 29 2021 20:07:42 EDT from Nurb432

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if i had not made mistake #2 in my life and stayed with EDS back in 1990, id have been in that sort of boat. I would have a a butt-ton of money, and retired at 40.

But nooooooo i was a freaking dumbass kid and couldn't see that far down the road.  

Sun Aug 29 2021 07:31:34 PM EDT from IGnatius T Foobar
Here in New York if you are young and uncommitted and have decent IT talent, the thing to do is work IT for a financial firm. Big, small, or in between, doesn't matter. They work you to the bone and pay you stupidly good money.
Most people who go this route burn out in about ten years. So if you're smart enough, you do the ten years and invest the money properly, then you can settle down and get married and have a really good financial base while working a more sustainable career.

It wasn't my path, as I already had a fiancee and a job offer waiting for me when I graduated. But it would have been interesting.

 



[#] Tue Aug 31 2021 08:44:29 EDT from LoanShark

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I wanted no part of the financial-sector rat race. Was very much aware of the "work you to the bone" part; that and they cannot accept failure because financial software is so mission critical.

So I chose to work in slightly less stressful sectors, get a paycheck that allowed me to pursue my interests, and still made an OK amount of money. Not looking back.

A former user of this BBS, Ford II, worked in finance for a while. This job (not sure if there was more than one, in the financial sector, for him; I haven't been in touch lately) went rather badly for him.

[#] Tue Aug 31 2021 08:45:37 EDT from LoanShark

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A former user of this BBS, Ford II, worked in finance for a while.

This job (not sure if there was more than one, in the financial sector,

for him; I haven't been in touch lately) went rather badly for him.


If I go back far enough in my email history, I might still have this long and email saved where he sounded rather upset... ugh.


Not fun.

[#] Sun Oct 10 2021 18:08:59 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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This weekend I am making another attempt at installing I2P on my network.
This time I'm going to try to live with it as a user for a while before I publish Uncensored as an I2P "destination". I know we have several I2P users on here so I'd like to solicit your opinions and tap into your knowledge if you'd care to indulge me.

For starters I'll describe my setup and you can tell me if it's acceptable.

This time around I am not running the I2P router on my desktop, and I am not running "purple" I2P. I have the mainline Java router installed on a Raspberry Pi 3B+ running 64-bit Ubuntu on a dedicated services VLAN in my network (i.e. NOT the one the home wireless network hands out). I've exposed the main I2P tunnel service port to the outside world on TCP and UDP just like the instructions say to do.

Since the router is not running on the same computer as the one I will use to access it, I went into the service configuration files and changed each service (router console, proxy service, mail/irc/etc. service) to listen on all interfaces instead of just the loopback. Yes, I know that this means anyone who can hit those ports can access the services, but as I said above, it is on a dedicated secure VLAN.

On my desktop -- which I want to be able to reboot from time to time without disrupting the tunnels -- I will configure all of my client software to point to the address of the machine running the router.

So far so good?

At this point the Pi seems to have enough gusto to do this job. I was only using it to test ARM builds of Citadel, and it's still going to do that, but that's hardly a 24/7 job :)

[#] Sun Oct 10 2021 18:14:49 EDT from Nurb432

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I always ran my apps on the same machine, but no reason that wont work.



[#] Tue Oct 12 2021 11:46:57 EDT from zelgomer

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This isn't too different from how I run I2P.  Just for the fun/learning experience of it, my setup is sort of a home-grown whonix.  I have a VM where I run I2P and TOR with two NICs: one faces the rest of my LAN and has WAN access, and the other one is connected to a virtual bridge.  Then I launch a second VM whose only NIC is connected to the virtual bridge, and he is served DHCP from the first VM which acts as his gateway.  I've exposed a select few I2P services to the "workstation" VM, and then any other traffic from that VM is routed through TOR.

Effectively the same situation, except no Raspberry Pis or VLANs.



[#] Tue Oct 12 2021 17:41:39 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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Good. I'm playing around as a user for a little while before I attempt to deploy services again. The router will continue to run at home because the nature of I2P means it can run pretty much anywhere, and I can just send the connections to the server's actual location over an encrypted tunnel.

Would the typical I2P user be more attracted to a text-based service, or to webcit running as an eepsite?

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