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[#] Sat Feb 16 2013 11:51:37 EST from asdfg @ Uncensored

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On office 2013 if your computer dies or you decide to upgrade to a new computer you have to buy a new office license. I would think this would discourage people from upgrading their hardware. It's more crap like this that makes rumors such as the Xbox internet always on drm protection scheme all the more believable.

[#] Sat Feb 16 2013 12:50:37 EST from dothebart @ Uncensored

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hm, so in the new surface tv comercial it actualy reads wikipedia in one of those tiles... so they finaly admit that encarta is dead?



[#] Sat Feb 16 2013 12:51:50 EST from dothebart @ Uncensored

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... maybe they put encarta ad acta? ;-)



[#] Sat Feb 16 2013 17:02:49 EST from zooer @ Uncensored

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I found my copy of Office 2003 the other day, it wasn't with my usual discs. I thought about installing it on
my mother's Windows 7 machine and then I realized the software is ten years old. Not that it has changed much
and my mother probably wouldn't use any changes but I wondered if some strange problem would develop.
She has whatever the basic Microsoft office product is, I would install open office but I wonder about odd
problems that might come up.

[#] Sun Feb 17 2013 00:01:41 EST from Ladyhawke @ Uncensored

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Wouldn't worry about it too much, Zooer.  Half my company is still using 2003 as they won't allow us to upgrade.



[#] Sun Feb 17 2013 07:36:51 EST from zooer @ Uncensored

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I believe in the if it works why change it theory. If my mom is happy the way things are leave it alone. After
ten years I am sure Microsoft isn't supporting it anymore and any software updates that were needed are no
longer available. I bleive there was an important update after I purchased it. On a related note without the
updates it means the swastika is still in one of the WingDing fonts.

[#] Sun Feb 17 2013 07:37:54 EST from zooer @ Uncensored

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I believe in the 'If it works why change it?' theory.

[#] Sun Feb 17 2013 13:19:29 EST from fireball @ Uncensored

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I bloody hate computer locked licencing, and I have no clue why it's still around.  I have too many computers and make too many upgrades to tolerate it if I don't really have to (and I can't recall a case that I did).



[#] Sun Feb 17 2013 16:05:46 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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I think it's cute that there are still people who are so stuck in the 20th century that they use software whose licenses require that you pay for it.

[#] Sun Feb 17 2013 18:54:49 EST from zooer @ Uncensored

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If you think it is cute than why do you spell Microsoft with a "$"? That seems angry, iF you thought it was
cute you would spell it with the "cute" Unicode smile face: Micr☺ s☺ ft.

(Not sure if those will print after I save)

[#] Mon Feb 18 2013 01:37:44 EST from asdfg @ Uncensored

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I think it's cute that Microsoft seems to be going out of it's way to make it's customers hate them. Acutally I don't, I think it's stupid.

[#] Mon Feb 18 2013 15:57:38 EST from fireball @ Uncensored

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Sun Feb 17 2013 04:05:46 PM EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored
I think it's cute that there are still people who are so stuck in the 20th century that they use software whose licenses require that you pay for it.

I don't know what you're on about, there are certainly instances where commercial products are far better than free equivilants, and cases where open source doesn't push development forward much, nor does the userbase often properly fund development of the free/open source projects (open source/free indie games, for one, have only surpassed hobby by donation in a few cases).   



[#] Mon Feb 18 2013 19:05:58 EST from dothebart @ Uncensored

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Mon Feb 18 2013 15:57:38 EST from fireball @ Uncensored

 

Sun Feb 17 2013 04:05:46 PM EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored
I think it's cute that there are still people who are so stuck in the 20th century that they use software whose licenses require that you pay for it.

I don't know what you're on about, there are certainly instances where commercial products are far better than free equivilants, and cases where open source doesn't push development forward much, nor does the userbase often properly fund development of the free/open source projects (open source/free indie games, for one, have only surpassed hobby by donation in a few cases).  

closed source has spawned sick products like ole or dde just to maintain that busines model and offer a limited interoperation model.

Meanwhile at least some bigger comunes like Munich have discovered the value of having the source for their infrastructure.

Be the cost of this somewhere inbetween the 18M Euro they told, or the 60 M Euro Microsoft made HP lie - I think its worth while not to put that money down the throats of Micro$oft and have the value in source available free to be shared with other cities - and - yes, with you in forms of patches to open/libre office.



[#] Mon Feb 18 2013 20:50:25 EST from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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Feb 16 2013 5:02pm from zooer @uncnsrd
I found my copy of Office 2003 the other day, it wasn't with my usual discs.
I thought about installing it on

I've used Office 2000 on Windows Vista and now Windows 7 with some success, although the icons look funny and there have been a few innocuous error dialogs due to OS incompatibilities.

All part of the fantastic Office 2000 MSDN licensing program, thank you William H. Hitler.

[#] Tue Feb 19 2013 00:57:17 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Micro$oft Office is a perfect example of the non-value of non-free software.
People continue to shell out US$500 every couple of years for an incremental upgrade of a set of programs that basically reached maturity 15 years ago, introducing with each new release only features that people hate (clippy, ribbon, etc), and the open source alternatives are every bit as good.

If there's any place where non free software might be appropriate it would be in places where domain specific knowledge is involved, and the value would be in paying for the developer's specialization in that knowledge domain.

[#] Tue Feb 19 2013 14:23:56 EST from Spell Binder @ Uncensored

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I agree with your last paragraph, IG. We use some specialized testing equipment here at my company. Putting aside the hardware costs, the equipment vendor we buy most of our gear from uses license-structured software as well. You want this feature? Buy a license for it. Want to get tech supprt for that feature? Buy a support contract. It's definitely a model I'm no fan of, but, for what we need to do here, their solution is one of the better ones.

On the flip side, I do wish that I had access to the source code for some of these products. There are always things I want to tweak. Either becuase something is broken, not performing well, or there's simply a better way to do something. To be honest, though, I have a hard time seeing how these products would be as good as they are if they were all open-source.

Don't get me wrong, I'm a proponent of open-source projects, and my main reasons are stated as above. However, it does seem to me that the current open-source culture of "if you need it, do it" has a major failing.
It assumes that everyone involved is motivated and capable of programming.
I'm sure there are contract programming houses that will gladly enhance or modify code for anyone willing to pay for it, but that, IMHO, ends up with a whole bunch of one-off implementations that may not work together. Even if all that code gets rolled back into the main projects, there's often a lack of design skills, be it software design, usability, interface design, etc.

I may be off base, but if the open-source community could pool together enough resources to focus on architecture, design, usability, documentation, etc., I think many of the open-source projects would benefit tremendously.
Open Binder

[#] Tue Feb 19 2013 23:50:52 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Careful there Spell, you're dangerously close to falling into the trap that Ragnar was always stuck in: assuming that the open source community has to act as a single entity with a single set of objectives.

Anyway, I do think that we hear a little too much of the "if you need it, do it" line. In this case, however, we're talking about basic platform software, which not only can be, but has been, implemented to the point of matching or even exceeding Hitler$oft's equivalent products. As I mentioned earlier, the general purpose office automation suite reached maturity about 15 years ago and does not justify re-spending hundreds of dollars every couple of years.

For other applications, I do tend to think that every problem is interesting to someone, somewhere. And yes, sometimes you do have duplication of effort, but as I mentioned above, the open source community is not a single entity.

[#] Thu Feb 21 2013 23:06:26 EST from asdfg @ Uncensored

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Well the playstation 4 is looking pretty good. I still don't put it past microsoft to drive most of the next gen console buyers to sony.

[#] Fri Feb 22 2013 11:42:10 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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The key to the Xbox's success was that the monopolists-in-charge pretty much left that group alone and let it do its own thing. The more "strategic" they make Xbox, the more it will suck.

[#] Sat Feb 23 2013 17:04:24 EST from zooer @ Uncensored

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I learned something today, Brian Eno created the Windows sound theme including the familiar start up sound in
1994. It was created on an Apple Macintosh.

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