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[#] Thu Apr 15 2021 15:09:30 EDT from ParanoidDelusions

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Thanks for all of the suggestions. I'll probably end up implementing one of these solutions. 



[#] Thu Apr 15 2021 15:47:46 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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I put all of my nightly backup jobs in /etc/cron.daily and allow them to run as root. <shrug>

rsync is definitely the correct tool, but I prefer to rsync from a snapshot rather than from the live data itself. This of course assumes you are using a filesystem that supports snapshots (I use btrfs).

My backup script, which runs on the source system, looks something like this:

1. Create a snapshot name that contains the day of the week (e.g. "Thursday")
2. If a snapshot by that name already exists, delete it.
3. Create a snapshot of the current live data using that name.
4. rsync the snapshot to the remote copy (using options -a and --delete)

This gives me a week of local "thin" backups to protect against mistakes, and an off-host backup to protect against catastrophic hardware failure.

I can share the script source if anyone is interested.

I also have another one somewhere that only keeps the snapshot around for the duration of the backup, and then we rotate the backups on the destination side.

[#] Sat May 08 2021 05:44:52 EDT from zooer

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Linking from Google Photos is tricky, it is better to share a link rather than try to hotlink or embed.

 



[#] Sat May 08 2021 07:21:31 EDT from Nurb432

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odd, i didnt think it was a hotlink, it came out of my paste buffer. 

Sat May 08 2021 05:44:52 AM EDT from zooer

Linking from Google Photos is tricky, it is better to share a link rather than try to hotlink or embed.

 



 



[#] Sat May 08 2021 07:58:07 EDT from Nurb432

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It seemed to work that time, even sucking it in via IMAP.

Normally i copy my image, paste it into gimp, resize, then take a screenshot of that to clip out any extra garbage in the image.  ( i do that both for size and to get rid of telemetry ).   I guess the original copy was still in the buffer.  which is odd. i wonder how many other times i ended up pasting the 'real' thing into places. 



[#] Sat May 08 2021 08:47:41 EDT from zooer

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Use Linux?  On all jpg images use "jhead -purejpg FILENAME.jpg" from the command line.

 

I see they have Windows and Mac versions as well. https://www.sentex.ca/~mwandel/jhead/

 



[#] Sat May 08 2021 09:39:03 EDT from Nurb432

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Ya i know there are other ways to strip the telemetrics, but doing the copy/resize/crop also lets me make the images smaller, and cut out non relevant pieces of the image. Like this one, you didnt want to see the back of my stove, or the wall..

Sat May 08 2021 08:47:41 AM EDT from zooer

Use Linux?  On all jpg images use "jhead -purejpg FILENAME.jpg" from the command line.

 

I see they have Windows and Mac versions as well. https://www.sentex.ca/~mwandel/jhead/

 



 



[#] Tue May 11 2021 06:10:48 EDT from zooer

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Sat May 08 2021 09:39:03 AM EDT from Nurb432

Ya i know there are other ways to strip the telemetrics, but doing the copy/resize/crop also lets me make the images smaller, and cut out non relevant pieces of the image. Like this one, you didnt want to see the back of my stove, or the wall..

I have some program on Linux (I am not on my Linux machine now) where I right-click on the file to resize it.  It wasn't part of the standard install, but it adds right-click functions.  I am sure it uses Imagemagic for the actual work.  The standard Linux image viewers will allow me to crop if need be.



[#] Tue May 11 2021 09:45:08 EDT from ParanoidDelusions

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Linux cut and paste into a browser is *terrible* - by the way. I've experienced problems with it on all browsers and across hardware platforms (Pi and Intel). 

I did some research on it... It is an area where both Mac OS X and Windows make it seem like something that is just a baseline feature. You open an image, you cut it to the paste board using a keyboard shortcut that is built in, and you paste it into a web-viewer window on Facebook, or a Citadel, or a blogger.com article... and it just works. 

It doesn't work so seamlessly on Linux. You've got to figure out how to make it happen - and it involves finding the right app and installing it. I don't remember more than that. One of those little things that makes me go, "overall, easier just to use a mainstream consumer OS for mainstream consumer tasks." Linux can have the internet and the web back-end, can drive the cloud - can host and serve all the apps. 

But for userland - it is never going to be the Year of the Linux desktop as long as things like this remain this difficult to do from a mainstream XWindows manager like Gnome. 

 

 

Tue May 11 2021 06:10:48 EDT from zooer

 

Sat May 08 2021 09:39:03 AM EDT from Nurb432

Ya i know there are other ways to strip the telemetrics, but doing the copy/resize/crop also lets me make the images smaller, and cut out non relevant pieces of the image. Like this one, you didnt want to see the back of my stove, or the wall..

I have some program on Linux (I am not on my Linux machine now) where I right-click on the file to resize it.  It wasn't part of the standard install, but it adds right-click functions.  I am sure it uses Imagemagic for the actual work.  The standard Linux image viewers will allow me to crop if need be.



 



[#] Wed May 12 2021 21:41:31 EDT from LoanShark

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But for userland - it is never going to be the Year of the Linux
desktop as long as things like this remain this difficult to do from

a mainstream XWindows manager like Gnome. 

Yup. Linux keeps getting better. And better. And better. Very slowly. Cut/paste is better than it used to be. But for desktop usage, in general, it's never going to get all the way there. Never. That's the conclusion I reached like a decade or two ago, and I haven't been proven wrong YET ;)


Developers, these days, tend to use macOS laptops. That was me, at my previous employer, too. I stayed there for about 7 years, doing Java. At the time, that was fine. macOS was a great platform for Java development, and writing the occasional shell script or Python script that you would then port to your Linux servers and deploy.

But then Java became a little less of a thing, and Dockerized deployables became a little more of a thing.

macOS is not a great platform for developing Docker containers. The docker engine hides a whole Virtualbox-hosted Linux machine under the covers and tries to make it all seamlessly appear like you're just hosting containers, the same way you would on a Linux dev box. The performance issues can be quite drastic.

When I started my current job, the situation was kinda interesting. In some ways, they hired me as Developer Employee #2, so I was careful to ask the principal guy what kind of environment he preferred. He said Windows plus Virtualbox because most of what we do is Linux and if you're going to run Linux in Vbox, it's better to have full control over it. That was what he was using at the time. Since then, he and I have both transitioned off of Vbox to full-time Linux usage. Because that's what we deploy on.

All of our other in-house, NYC based developers are still macOS users. They're all a bit Linux-shy. The consultants we work with are actually better with Linux than any of our in-house folk.

So from where I sit, it sorta looks like all but the most senior American developers these days are uncomfortable with Linux as a desktop OS. That should tell you something.

And Linux was a fiddly, frustrating process to get set up on my work laptop.



Most of my grey hairs are from my previous job, but a few of the new ones came from setting up Linux on that laptop.

[#] Thu May 13 2021 10:42:26 EDT from ParanoidDelusions

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Yup. 

I enjoy the *challenge* of Linux - and I appreciate what it is capable once I brute-force my way into getting it to work right through sheer perseverance and determination - but I understand that most computer end-users, including admins and other professionals - do NOT find the journey as interesting as the destination when it comes to deploying, utilizing, maintaining, and supporting information systems. 

Linux desktop users are a lot like car modification enthusiasts - they take a lot of pride in taking some cobbled together, salvage title clunker, making it faster than an M4, cooler looking than a brand new C07 Vette, and customized *exactly* how they want it, in every aspect. 

But sometimes the turn signal goes on when you shift into 6th gear, they don't trust the brakes, and the passenger door won't close again if you open it - and it is a total bitch when they have to get it smogged to re-register it.

As an interesting piece of evidence for this claim - I got my license plate for my M4 - and grabbed a phillips head driver to put it on - got out there, and... 

Discovered that the screws holding on the plate are the star-type heads. 

BMW sometimes tacitly admits that they've got a hard-on for Apple's marketing and niche market to pretentious snobs that has replaced their focus on being "the Ultimate driving machine," in decades past. 

"Surely, if you own a BMW - then you own Apple products and have probably already purchased a set of Mac tools..."  

Of course, I do, and have - so I went back inside and got my Mac tools so I could put my plate on my BMW. 

But, it made me feel kind of dirty and fooled.  

I mean, honestly, there has always been a correlation with BMW and the odds of an Apple sticker being on the car somewhere. 

 

Wed May 12 2021 21:41:31 EDT from LoanShark
But for userland - it is never going to be the Year of the Linux
desktop as long as things like this remain this difficult to do from

a mainstream XWindows manager like Gnome. 



All of our other in-house, NYC based developers are still macOS users. They're all a bit Linux-shy. The consultants we work with are actually better with Linux than any of our in-house folk.

So from where I sit, it sorta looks like all but the most senior American developers these days are uncomfortable with Linux as a desktop OS. That should tell you something.

And Linux was a fiddly, frustrating process to get set up on my work laptop.





[#] Thu May 13 2021 10:53:03 EDT from LoanShark

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I mean, honestly, there has always been a correlation with BMW and
the odds of an Apple sticker being on the car somewhere. 

And for all that, the dragged their feet on supporting CarPlay, and when they did, they charged a subscription fee :-D

[#] Thu May 13 2021 14:51:15 EDT from Nurb432

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Holy cross-topic batman.



[#] Thu May 13 2021 16:04:02 EDT from ParanoidDelusions

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Try figuring out if your iDrive will ever get the update to support Android Auto. The short answer is, if it is a 2020 or older, probably not. 

I don't think software and operating systems are really the strong suit of Germans. 

Had a friend who was a architecture engineer at Intel - who worked a lot with Siemens - and he said that their documentation was terrible and their ability to explain things was worse - that they acted like everyone should just "know" these things. 

I've experienced this with other projects with German InfoTech engineering - to think this must be a bit of a cultural thing. They don't work well with others. 

 

 

Thu May 13 2021 10:53:03 EDT from LoanShark
I mean, honestly, there has always been a correlation with BMW and
the odds of an Apple sticker being on the car somewhere. 

And for all that, the dragged their feet on supporting CarPlay, and when they did, they charged a subscription fee :-D

 



[#] Sat May 15 2021 21:51:05 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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The "Linux on the desktop" topic is so last week. Use it if you like it.
It's as usable as any other operating system if it has the software you need to run. And since most of what we do is through a browser now, it matters less than ever.

[#] Sat May 15 2021 22:44:47 EDT from ParanoidDelusions

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Sat May 15 2021 21:51:05 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar
The "Linux on the desktop" topic is so last week. Use it if you like it.
It's as usable as any other operating system if it has the software you need to run. And since most of what we do is through a browser now, it matters less than ever.  it makes no more or less sense than any *other* option. 


Fixed that for you. I'm not ANTI-Linux, on principle. If it were as easy, convenient, flexible and supported as other OSes, or better - I'd use it. Especially considering that it is absolutely more *trustworthy* on privacy issues. 

I always remind people, I run Citadel - now on Proxmox. If Linux can provide the quantifiably *best* solution to my desired outcome - I'll run it. 

It is just that generally, Linux solutions are difficult, substandard, unreliable and inconsistent compared to their alternatives - which are often priced so affordably that the alternatives are the better choice. 

Blender is *super* powerful, if you learn it - but it is poorly documented and complex. It is better to pay for Poser, or to use DAZ3d for free - which are both superior software from a casual end-user perspective. 

I could name a dozen other examples, if i put my mind to it. 
 

 



[#] Sun May 16 2021 07:18:34 EDT from Nurb432

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Ya.

I guess one could change to "mainstream desktop" but i have been using it as my primary for decades.  And agreed, "desktop" is becoming less and less relevant as we move full circle back to managed data/applications. 

Sat May 15 2021 09:51:05 PM EDT from IGnatius T Foobar
The "Linux on the desktop" topic is so last week. Use it if you like it.
It's as usable as any other operating system if it has the software you need to run. And since most of what we do is through a browser now, it matters less than ever.

 



[#] Sun May 16 2021 07:23:11 EDT from Nurb432

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And if i didnt mention it before i paid for blender.  I still have my license 'key card' in my signed manual.

For those who didnt know, this was back before NaN ( the company who originally developed it in house for their own use ) went under. They were a PR firm and used it to do gfx for their clients. At some point they offered it for sale to the rest of us to use.  Soon (?) after they went under and took it with them.   But then later i helped pay for Ton, the main developer and one of the companies founders, to buy the code and release it to all of us.

It is one of the success stories from 'back then'.



[#] Sun May 16 2021 09:12:43 EDT from ParanoidDelusions

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Blender is powerful. It is also super complex and poorly documented. It is better for those dedicated enough to learn it who want to have complete power over it. 

DAZ and Poser are more accessible to people of average drive and motivation. 

And that is almost ALWAYS the dividing line between *nix and mainstream alternatives. 

*nix ripping programs tend to be more powerful than Windows based alternatives if you want to really be able to control cracking the protection on DVDs and BluRays. 

But the commercial ones are good enough for the average consumer who just wants to make backups of their movies. 

GIMP is *not* as good as Photoshop, though. Either - you need training. GIMP is pretty powerful for something that is FREE though. As free as your time, anyhow. 

Linux absolutely has its use models - but even something as simple as cutting and pasting an image into a web browser can require a LOT of effort on Linux, where in Windows and OS X - "it just works." 

That is the thing that drives me nuts about the Linux acolytes - that they argue that Linux is "more stable"... that it doesn't crash... that they never get BSODs... 


Mac users do this too. First off, not true. I get crashing apps on all platforms - and I get about as many BSOD crashes as I get Mac and Linux kernel panics. They're fairly rare on all platforms now. The more you're asking of your machine, the more likely you are to experience these things, too. 

But more than that - it is the tiny little things on Linux that don't work that require you to dig through the Internet, deal with a bunch of neckbeards telling you to RTFM, and learn all kinds of other related things in order to fix - like cut and paste of images into Webbrowser forums... that absolutely DON'T work like they should on Linux... 

And the answer from Linux users tends to be, "why would you want to do that?"  or some variation of that. "It isn't *broken* - it just isn't supported because it is a... security risk, a dumb feature, better done with a python script from the command line..." or some other excuse. 

Or... "That doesn't work because the system you're on has hardware that has proprietary closed source drivers and the evil company won't release Linux versions. It isn't the fault of Linux - it is the fault of Company X and their vile capitalist desire to hide their IP from public review. You should use better hardware..." 

Debian has tried to approach that problem with the non-free repos - but they should be enabled by default. Instead of "Most Hostile" toward closed source, Linux should have "Most Permissive" toward closed source as the default, and let the purists opt OUT of non-free distro repos. 

The idealism of the Linux community kind of bugs me. 

 

Sun May 16 2021 07:23:11 EDT from Nurb432

And if i didnt mention it before i paid for blender.  I still have my license 'key card' in my signed manual.

For those who didnt know, this was back before NaN ( the company who originally developed it in house for their own use ) went under. They were a PR firm and used it to do gfx for their clients. At some point they offered it for sale to the rest of us to use.  Soon (?) after they went under and took it with them.   But then later i helped pay for Ton, the main developer and one of the companies founders, to buy the code and release it to all of us.

It is one of the success stories from 'back then'.



 



[#] Sun May 16 2021 09:35:12 EDT from Nurb432

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Blender was/IS cross platform :)    I'm purely speaking of the OSS component here, didnt mean it to be a linux/windows/whatever thing in this case. 

And i agree it was complex, but so was any other 3D tool of that caliber.  And they all had their own quirks for an interface.  Its not like a text editor or spreadsheet something that was pretty 'standardized'.  In the old days it was better documented. Over time features have become more important than documentation.  I do agree that is a shame, as unless you *really* know it, you are missing out on features. It was also REALLY resource friendly back then. Tiny, ran on older hardware, but took advantage of better hardware if you had it. 

Truespace was another that was not so 'intuitive' either, but once you got use to it, things were fine.  For a real bizarre one Amapi3D. Once you get proficient in one, moving around is tough. 

I was a huge fan of TS until Microsoft bought it and killed it. I still am not sure why they did it. Used to compete in the annual contests.. One of our interns at Ford, got him involved 3D using TS, he ended up getting hired as a logo designer and moved to corporate. He was a natural, just never knew until i showed him a few things.  In no time he was showing ME stuff.

Much like Poser, Bryce was pretty easy, even for the beginner. Used to use it for landscapes to import into other things all the time.   There is a 'poser like' OSS 3rd party app now that supports Blender. ( and OpenSim ).  That is a fork however, as the original guy just one day vanished and pulled all his code from everywhere. 

Staroffice was another 'success story' of sorts. Commercial package ( i had bought it too, i always did pay for what i used on a regular basis ) then at some point sun micro systems bought it and opened the code ( as much as they could, the DB module was proprietary, for example ).  Ended up becoming LibreOffice eventually, after forking 'OpenOffice' which was the re-branded starOffice code, in the beginning..   Tho i still liked the old SO way of doing things as a 'single package'. Email/files/browsing/office/communications all in one consistent place.   A lot like Ashton Tate's "framework" a decade earlier, which im sure you can guess i was a fan of. Same idea, everything under one roof and everything 'worked the same'.

 

 

And im rambling about times gone by, simpler times..  Ill stop now.



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