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[#] Sat Jun 08 2019 01:22:06 EDT from ParanoidDelusions

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Moving from California to Ohio, I had a helluva time adjusting to language out there. 

Waitresses calling me "honey" and "sugar" and "sweetie," always made me feel uncomfortable. We're not that familiar with strangers in California. We think you're trying to run a con if you're that nice to us. 


So, once we had a baby-sitter come over, and after the evening, my wife and I were talking to her, and I was trying to figure out how much to pay her. We did not, unfortunately, negotiate a price before we left. 

I said, "Is $20 ok, honey?" 

Asking my WIFE... 

And the baby sitter responded, "Yeah, that sounds great..." 

And my wife (also a Californian) glared at me like, "Why is the BABY SITTER responding to YOU when you say HONEY?!?" 

And then the baby sitter saw the discomfort between my wife and I - and that made HER visibly uncomfortable... 

Which of course, made EVERYTHING worse... 

It was pretty rough, man. 

True story. 

It was the first time I had met that baby sitter, which is the only thing that got things back on track. If it had been the 3rd or 4th time she had watched our kid... I'd probably be divorced right now. 

 



[#] Thu Jun 13 2019 23:44:57 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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"Honey" must be compounded to make it more endearing if you need to use it to refer exclusively to your wife. I address the lovely Mrs. IG as "honeybear" or "hunny bunny", neither of which a babysitter would ever answer to. She still thinks I don't know her name because I absolutely never address her by name.

[#] Thu Jun 13 2019 23:50:03 EDT from ParanoidDelusions

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Thu Jun 13 2019 23:44:57 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar
"Honey" must be compounded to make it more endearing if you need to use it to refer exclusively to your wife. I address the lovely Mrs. IG as "honeybear" or "hunny bunny", neither of which a babysitter would ever answer to. She still thinks I don't know her name because I absolutely never address her by name.

This is not bad advice. I wish I had known this then. :) 

Fortunately I am back out in the West, where if you call a baby-sitter "honey", you're likely to end up talking to CPS and explaining that you also call soda "pop" and dinner "supper." :) 

 



[#] Fri Jun 14 2019 10:45:00 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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"dinner" is the primary and largest meal of the day. "supper" is the evening meal. Sometimes they are the same meal, and sometimes they are not (particularly on Sundays, i.e. "Sunday Dinner" is often consumed in the afternoon).

(Source: I am a board-certified Italian grandmother.)

And now for something different: an ongoing pet peeve ... people writing/talking about television news, using the word "chyron" to describe any broadcast graphics on the bottom of the screen. They talk about something that was written in

"the chyron", most often in what is technically called a "crawl" (if it's scrolling horizontally).

Chyron is one of the oldest and most well-known manufacturers of broadcast graphics hardware. Oxford and Merriam-Webster both have it as a definition now, with merely a reference to the fact that its etymology is from Chyron the manufacturer. I guess Chyron has gone into that generic afterworld along with Kleenex and Xerox.

[#] Fri Jun 14 2019 11:56:04 EDT from zooer

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and Q-tips.

The use of the word "Chyron" is new, 'text on the screen' and 'graphics' are what I remember.



[#] Fri Jul 26 2019 10:27:55 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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Back in the 1980's when I did television production in high school, we looked at photos and specs of real Chyrons and wished we could afford that kind of equipment. We had a character generator typical for public access studios of the time, the cheap 30x12 all-caps low resolution machine.

So any time some twit refers to any on-screen graphics as "the chyron" it makes my skin crawl a little.

[#] Thu Aug 29 2019 15:20:36 EDT from nonservator

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I was sick of the non-word "blog" when it first appeared. Now my reaction alternates between eyeroll and homicide.



[#] Wed Sep 04 2019 00:59:18 EDT from ParanoidDelusions

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I was a "blogger" for Tech Republic for a while. Paid gig. It was nice. I write a blog still, and get around 500 unique hits a month or more if I nurture it. But... I kind of hate the word blog and blogger too... but the alternative, "content producer," which is what CBS called us as writers, always seemed kind of a pretentious way to say, "I'm not considered a journalist by CBS, but I write reviews, articles, howto documents, and other content for them...."


[#] Wed Sep 04 2019 09:51:44 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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"content" is a word chosen to turn creative work into an exchangeable commodity.

[#] Wed Sep 04 2019 10:24:47 EDT from darknetuser

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Yeah, it is weird. I write for various firms and they don't call my stuff "content". They call them "articles", "columns", "novels" or whatever they are.

[#] Wed Sep 04 2019 21:56:33 EDT from ParanoidDelusions

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Absolutely. I am the "content creator," they own exclusive license to use the content I create any way they want, and I get paid ONCE for it, no matter what. That is how it works.

[#] Thu Sep 05 2019 10:05:41 EDT from darknetuser

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I used to work with book publishers, which work a different way. You are basically paid per sale. You may get a forward pay if you are a big name but that is about it.
I have basically stopped writing books precisely because of how badly the whole thing works. And because I don't feel supported by the friends and the public, but that is another matter.

[#] Mon Sep 09 2019 01:14:28 EDT from ParanoidDelusions

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Thu Sep 05 2019 10:05:41 EDT from darknetuser
I used to work with book publishers, which work a different way. You are basically paid per sale. You may get a forward pay if you are a big name but that is about it.
I have basically stopped writing books precisely because of how badly the whole thing works. And because I don't feel supported by the friends and the public, but that is another matter.

I have a couple of friends who have self-published eBooks and seem fairly happy with the results they achieved - but it seems like an awful lot of work. 

 

 



[#] Mon Sep 09 2019 09:09:13 EDT from darknetuser

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I have a couple of friends who have self-published eBooks and seem
fairly happy with the results they achieved - but it seems like an
awful lot of work. 


My experience after being there and being at conventions and knowing people in the industry:
If you want to have your books read, you need to be able to make them, distribute them and advertise them. Self-publishing platforms usually just disribute them, which means they don't cover enough of the process and that is why most self-publishing crashes hard.
You can make self-publishing _sorta_ _kindda_

_somehow_ sell your books, but the return of investment for your time is so bad that you WILL get depressed if you make the numbers.
I suspect self-publishers that manage to sell more than 100 books per year are either a) publishing tonnes of books that are equal to each other, so selling a copy of each a month compensates for the year b) have friends that support them a fucking lot.
I know I sound very negative, but fact is, every next guy is publishing or self-publishing a book. If you release a book now, it will be lost in a sea of millions of books. No matter how good it is, you are not making it known alone. And you are not gonna make it known with help most likely.
See, I have sacrificed important things to get my books self-published and sold, and you usually don't realize when you are in it. But now I know better. It is really not worth it. Unless you are in it only for the ego trip of having a professional printed copy in your house.

[#] Mon Sep 23 2019 10:33:46 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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Self publishing seems like the kind of thing you do just because you have something to say, not because you're going into the process looking to make a lot of money.

Famous authors can probably get away with it, but I suppose if you're that famous you can get favorable terms from a publisher.

[#] Thu Jan 16 2020 20:32:18 EST from IGnatius T Foobar

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"Table Stakes"

That seems to be the new buzzword; I'm hearing it everywhere. It means what it sounds like it means (when used as a buzzword), the needful which must kindly be done before a discussion or project may be permitted to begin.

On that note, I've noticed that "kindly do the needful" has declined. I suppose the people who use it have become aware that the rest of us lampoon it.

[#] Mon Jan 20 2020 14:30:47 EST from Ragnar Danneskjold

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I've noticed that every company has a peculiar vernacular that spreads throughout.


It became readily apparent when I left my data center job and came back for a meeting about a year later.

People in the meeting had adopted some newspeak, and I had no idea what they were talking about.

Now that I'm about and about with more customers, it's even more stark.

[#] Mon Jan 20 2020 23:26:54 EST from wizard of aahz

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Letting you speak to customers is a terribly worrying thought.

[#] Thu Jan 23 2020 16:21:18 EST from Ragnar Danneskjold

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Yeah, fuck those assholes.

[#] Wed Feb 12 2020 08:51:32 EST from wizard of aahz

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I thought there was some sort of buffer that had been built specifically to stop you from speaking to customers.