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[#] Thu Apr 02 2020 12:49:50 EDT from triLcat @ Uncensored

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easier to fake a passport than a chip

 



[#] Sat Apr 04 2020 14:06:34 EDT from darknetuser @ Uncensored

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2020-04-02 12:49 from triLcat
easier to fake a passport than a chip

 


Which is kind of another problem, since the main reason for governments to keep registries is to either tax things or keep the ability to destroy or confiscate the registered things.

[#] Thu Apr 09 2020 17:47:41 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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If chipping is basically your passport and shot record, that'll have


The problem here isn't identifying the patient. The problem is that doctors and hospitals can know who the patient is using conventional forms of identification, but they still do not have access to the patient's medical records from other providers.

The task of building a universal medical record for each patient requires federating the data (possibly by mandate) in a secure way, which probably cannot be done. The alternative is to grant the government a monopoly on storing and maintaining everyone's medical records, which has obvious huge problems.

Chipping an animal only identifies the animal's human companion. Chipping a human would only identify who the person is.

Since we're already at a point where biometric identification works (and with facial recognition, it can already be done without consent) it's not a big deal to give each person a universal, unique, non-transferrable, biometric identifier. It won't solve the medical record problem, but it might perhaps be used to prove, for example, that a doctor or hospital has the patient in question on site -- for example, if a medical record at some distant hospital can only be remotely accessed using a challenge that requires the patient's biometric private key.

It could also be used to prevent things like voter fraud.

[#] Thu Apr 09 2020 18:19:59 EDT from darknetuser @ Uncensored

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The task of building a universal medical record for each patient

requires federating the data (possibly by mandate) in a secure way,

which probably cannot be done. The alternative is to grant the
government a monopoly on storing and maintaining everyone's medical

records, which has obvious huge problems.

Universal medical records sound like a mess to me.

Each doctor fills his medical record archives using his own style of organizing things. I mesh of disjointed records from different doctors sounds hellish. Small hospitals that have such a thing usually have lots of access control issues regarding them. I am not optimistic enough to think that problem will disappear if the scope of the database gets bigger.

On the other hand, I have seen a couple of electronic identifycation systems by governments, each created to replaced the failed system that came before it. They are total shit and a moneygrab. I doubt the ability of the government to create something like that and keep it working.

[#] Thu Apr 09 2020 21:24:14 EDT from zooer @ Uncensored

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Thu Apr 09 2020 05:47:41 PM EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored
It could also be used to prevent things like voter fraud. 

So you are saying it will never be implemented. 



[#] Fri Apr 17 2020 14:23:06 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Each doctor fills his medical record archives using his own style of

organizing things. I mesh of disjointed records from different doctors

sounds hellish. Small hospitals that have such a thing usually have
lots of access control issues regarding them. I am not optimistic
enough to think that problem will disappear if the scope of the
database gets bigger.

I agree that one big database to supplant all of the others would be a disaster.

That's why I think a universal medical "record" would actually be an index of records kept at individual health care providers, perhaps encrypted with the patient's private key or something like that to prevent abuse.

When I started going to an orthopedist here in NY, she wasn't able to look at the medical records from the hospital in Texas where I was initially treated for the broken ankle. Some of the records could not be sent, and others had to be delivered by paper mail. Later on, she had me get a CT scan at another location, which I had to physically bring to her on a CD.

But do you know who had no trouble getting access to everything? My worker's comp carrier. Because if they don't get the information, the bills don't get paid. This tells me that it's totally possible.

The details are not that important because they can be worked out. It probably would involve something like the patient cryptographically signing a provider's key with their personal key to give that provider consent to participate in the patient's medical record federation.

[#] Mon Apr 27 2020 09:23:06 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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In other news, apparently the next version of Microsoft 365 (the product formerly known as "Office") will begin flagging two spaces after a period as a grammatical error.

[#] Mon Apr 27 2020 10:18:08 EDT from darknetuser @ Uncensored

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2020-04-27 09:23 from IGnatius T Foobar
In other news, apparently the next version of Microsoft 365 (the
product formerly known as "Office") will begin flagging two spaces
after a period as a grammatical error.



I think LibreOffice has been doing that for some time now. At least for dobble spaces between sentences.

[#] Mon Apr 27 2020 10:57:44 EDT from wizard of aahz @ Uncensored

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They're trying to make certain you're not using extraneous diskspace by lessening the spaces between sentences. It makes perfect sense to me. <Sarcasm for those who cannot see the blue font>

[#] Mon Apr 27 2020 11:10:33 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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It is the current year. There should be at least six feet between sentences.

[#] Mon Apr 27 2020 11:49:07 EDT from wizard of aahz @ Uncensored

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Nice.

[#] Mon Apr 27 2020 20:36:08 EDT from Ragnar Danneskjold @ Uncensored

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I refuse to single space between sentences. It just looks bad.

[#] Wed Apr 29 2020 11:28:51 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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I doubt I could get out of the habit without putting a lot of effort into it, and it isn't worth the effort. Besides, many of us still spend a lot of time working in monospace fonts, where the double space convention started because it looks good.

[#] Mon May 18 2020 11:53:01 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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"Microsoft was on the wrong side of history when open source exploded at the beginning of the century and I can say that about me personally. The good news is that, if life is long enough, you can learn that you need to change."
-- Microsoft president Brad Smith

Doesn't every wife-beater say that at some point? It isn't the first time I've compared Microsoft to domestic abuse.

[#] Tue May 26 2020 13:36:26 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

Subject: WTF?

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"Those who do not understand Unix are condemned to reinvent it ... poorly." 

    -- Henry Spencer

(There's a screenshot above this line, for those of you not viewing this in a web browser.)

Yes, that's right ... Windows now has a Linux-like "package manager", like APT or YUM except this one installs ... something.  Maybe it's just a command-line interface to the Windows Store, who knows.  They really ought to just give up on this whole Windows OS thing and make Windows a GUI on top of Linux, like they should have done with Xenix 30 years ago.



[#] Tue May 26 2020 17:14:58 EDT from darknetuser @ Uncensored

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There is a leaked bunch of Windows NT source code floating around i2p. They say you can compile an operating system out of it. hmmm.

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