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[#] Thu Aug 02 2012 12:51:29 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

Subject: Re: Metro for the masses

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There is probably some amusement in entertaining the idea that Microsoft wanted to control both the GTK and Qt toolsets, and that is why they kept both Miguel de Icaza and Stephen Elop on their payroll. But the toolkits seem to be getting away from the minions...

[#] Thu Aug 09 2012 17:20:39 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Hey, check it out ... [ http://goo.gl/gs3EW ]

SCO is finally in Chapter 7 bankruptcy. Sure took long enough.

I suppose in retrospect we can call the SCO debacle a Microsoft pilot project in Linux extortion, since they later perfected their technique and are now using sooper-seekrit patent agreements with individual Linux companies instead of simply funding obvious trolls.

[#] Fri Aug 10 2012 08:13:52 EDT from dothebart @ Uncensored

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Yes, SCO shurely was a test animal to burn while making software patent negotiations a working business.

And, I guess it paved the land for lots of other things which are going on in the legal sector right now.

But, we also see, judges aren't as clueless as we always might think, and some meanwhile are getting more encuraged to slapping the offender.

I hope this trend continues.



[#] Sat Aug 18 2012 07:53:29 EDT from harry @ Uncensored

Subject: Looking for a linux-based Citadel for telnet users

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 I am new to linux, fleeing Windows, and want to host a linux-based BBS.

 In thhe past, I have run a Windows-based Cit BBS, but I don't want to do so now.

 I'd like to download a simple linux-based Cit program that can handle telnet users.

 I know that this BBS code can do a whole lot more than that, but, for now, I just

 want to support the telnet side of things at first. Apache and the web side can come later.

 I have a linux-based server to run the Cit on. I just need a download webpage

 for this or any other Cit BBS that can hhandle telnet users that runs native in linux.

 Any and all help will be greatly appreciated.

 Thanks in advance,

 Harry.



[#] Sun Aug 19 2012 08:43:47 EDT from the_mgt @ Uncensored

Subject: Re: Looking for a linux-based Citadel for telnet users

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hello harry!

Have you had a look at http://citadel.org/doku.php?id=installation:start ?

Which flavour of linux are you running? Getting the telnet part up and running should be fairly easy. 



[#] Sun Aug 19 2012 09:35:07 EDT from dothebart @ Uncensored

Subject: Re: Looking for a linux-based Citadel for telnet users

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[#] Mon Aug 27 2012 06:38:05 EDT from TheOneLaw @ Uncensored

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Fri Nov 04 2011 07:36:24 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored
Oooh, I like the idea of a "rolling" distribution. It's definitely not for everyone, but the idea of simply getting constant updates instead of ever having a Big New Version (tm) seems attractive for an end user.

Let us know how that works out for you.

Just remembered to let you know, LMDE XFCE 64bit worked out just fine, as near as we can tell.

No problems yet, anyway.

Just revisited this as we are upgrading our backup to the new 201204 version to get the Citadel 8.14 in place.

Seems ok so far.

 

LMDE turns out to be more of a 'lurching' adventure than a rolling distribution as the updates are generally waiting on

clusters of upgrades to make it through the vetting process before getting into the updates arena.  A debian characteristic of sorts.


The heartburn of worrying about whether everything will hold together after an upgrade

 is probably just about as focus-intensive as a full bare-metal reinstall but the thought is that

 everything remains more or less in the same place each time without those moments

 where you discover that some of your key software no longer works at all because

someone decided to remove all the wheels, for no particularly urgent reason.  (I also use SeisUnix, which has had moments)

This business of improving software by cyclically adding unrelated functionality seems to be a disease with no cure,

 as the saga with KDE and now GNOME seems to illustrate.  A global epidemic?

They should have forked off with their grand ideas and left the train on the same rails (I do use KDE4 now sometimes, but....)

 

If you cannot just upgrade in place, and are required to re-Frakking-install each and every time the basis iterates,

  there is a fundamental problem in someones 'big picture' program.

-- 

TheOneLaw



[#] Mon Aug 27 2012 15:10:13 EDT from the_mgt @ Uncensored

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Why not use a real rolling distro like Arch or Gentoo (where the package maintainer is currently procrastinanting with other stuff instead of updating the ebuilds..... ;)? I don't know if there is an arch... build script or something, but could be done, I think.

The other way of dealing with this stuff is using a LTS version of a distro. As a conservativ debian (and derivates) hater, I chose centos for some of my servers. Centos6 is going to stay for a while. On the other hand, I am considering ClearOS as an alternative for more SBS like installs.



[#] Sun Sep 02 2012 07:53:41 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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You know something ... Linus Torvalds is one of the most brilliant developers in the world. He runs circles around everyone else. But when he speaks about anything other than software development he's a complete bonehead. That's kind of disappointing.

[#] Sun Sep 02 2012 18:06:21 EDT from zooer @ Uncensored

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I forget how easy installing Linux can be. I was still using Ubuntu 10.4 and not wanting to install for many reasons. I installed Debian side-by-side with Ubuntu and things are relativly smooth. Not perfect but what isn't working I am learning or
at least remembering what I forgot when I installed the last time.

[#] Tue Sep 04 2012 10:09:37 EDT from the8088er @ Uncensored

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I don't care much for Ubuntu but I have to hand it to them -- their install is painless and the hardware support is great. Debian is pretty good now too but they don't include a lot of "non-free" firmware that you have to install manually and things just don't seem to configure as easily in my experience.

[#] Tue Sep 04 2012 10:30:08 EDT from zooer @ Uncensored

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I started linux on a command line server, I wanted to give a desktop environment a try and I think I dual booted SUSE with
KDE. I hated it. I had messed around a little with other distros/environments but not enough. Then my ex-boss had a
project he wanted me to work on in the last few weeks of my ex-company's operations. He wanted it on Ubuntu with the
default Gnome flavor. I was empressed, things were easy and everything seemed to work. I installed and started to dual
boot with it at home and very quickly it became my OS of choice. If I had any questions I thought the forums were very
friendly and helpful.

I dislike Gnome3/unity, I was ready for something else. I tried Fedora but not enough and felt Debian was the next step in
the evolution. I don't think Debian people are as friendly as the Ubuntu crowd.

[#] Tue Sep 04 2012 14:12:54 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Achieving the "classic" GNOME desktop with GNOME 3 on Debian is surprisingly easy. Install the package "gnome-panel" and you're good to go. Ubuntu offers no such flexibility.

Although I must admit I am beginning to warm up to GNOME Shell.

[#] Tue Sep 04 2012 20:06:57 EDT from zooer @ Uncensored

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I noticed I downloaded and am using Debian version 6 (Squeeze). It came with Gnome 2. It also has a
lot of older versions of programs such as GIMP and VirtualBox. Those I am not happy about wish it
game with the latest versions of those programs.

[#] Tue Sep 04 2012 22:52:39 EDT from the8088er @ Uncensored

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I have a Gnome install on a freebie HP laptop... if I could just get the touchpad to work right...

[#] Wed Sep 05 2012 08:26:28 EDT from zooer @ Uncensored

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I am still pissed Debian doesn't have the latest GIMP and Virtualbox. If a two year old version of Ubuntu has the latest Vitualbox
then Debian should.

[#] Wed Sep 05 2012 09:28:00 EDT from dothebart @ Uncensored

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I wouldn't run a debian stable on a desktop.

testing usualy is stable enough (unless the first 2 months after stable is released...)

there are also backports, if you like to install more modern software on the aging stable stuff.



[#] Wed Sep 05 2012 11:38:15 EDT from zooer @ Uncensored

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Tried backports for GIMP, said I had the latest version. I know Ubuntu had PPAs you could add. I think with GIMP there was a
dependency that was needed.

Feh, maybe I should just get away from the Debian style and move on to something else.

[#] Thu Sep 06 2012 12:06:06 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Didn't you hear? The Linux desktop is dead. Miguel de Icaza said so.

[#] Thu Sep 06 2012 13:07:22 EDT from zooer @ Uncensored

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Yeah, and Gnome3 killed it. I am looking at Fedora but I am not sure. They don't have a release date for Debian 7 yet, and the
"known problems" list doesn't make me happy.

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