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[#] Tue Jan 12 2016 13:24:58 EST from vince-q @ Cascade Lodge BBS

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The one show I've always dreamed of conducting, and never have, is South Pacific - a truly magnificent score! Oh well, I guess I can still put that on my Bucket List....

[#] Tue Jan 12 2016 16:46:10 EST from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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Adding L/R rear channels will *astound* you when watching movies.

Haven't figured out where to put the damned things. Won't be able to put them at the 110degree ideal, quite. Might be able to get close, at about 90 and 90 if I put them on new shelves or rearrange storage bins and furniture. The "money seat" is up against the right side of a bookcase, so the other option is sticking them up on top of the bookcase, the SR would be almost directly overhead in that case and the SL would be a few feet left, both almost at ceiling height.

[#] Tue Jan 12 2016 19:00:07 EST from vince-q @ Cascade Lodge BBS

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Near ceiling height is ok. Angle them down about 20 degrees and "toe" them inward (toward the center of the room) VERY slightly.

They are "effects" speakers. You will know you have it right when the only way you notice that they are there is by turning them off. "Noticable by their absence" is what I call it.

[#] Tue Jan 12 2016 19:06:15 EST from vince-q @ Cascade Lodge BBS

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Just had an idea.
Mount them to the walls, left and right of the room.
They sell the appropriate mounting hardware at Best Buy or also Guitar Center. The brackets will allow you to swivel the speakers to the left or right, and also up/down, and you should be able to tighten them into position once you have them where they work best.

--Me

[#] Wed Jan 13 2016 11:28:53 EST from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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Yeah, that may be the best option. Just putting them on furniture in the same locations might mean removing The Boss's arrangement of antlers and pinecones--a potentially serious violation of the Signicant-Other Acceptance Factor! They'd be at 90 and 90, unless we slide the "money seat" forward into the room a bit. You can't move the speakers backwards, but you can move the seat forwards... there is just not a lot of space. Small room.

If I end up putting something on top of the bookshelf, instead, maybe the best option is a pair of those 90 degree bipole things, so that half the sound bounces off the side walls.





The reason the bookshelf might be best, is that then, the person on the couch is not so very close to SL

[#] Thu Jan 14 2016 00:46:01 EST from vince-q @ Cascade Lodge BBS

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The bipole arrangement ONLY works if your digital soundfield processor has that mode as an option. Yamaha, Onkyo, Denon and Sony do ***not*** support that and I very strongly discourage using that unless you have a Lexicon processor - that is the only processor, to my knowledge, which can handle that sort of thing, and I don't know if they even exist any more. They were fairly "big" back in the '90s but they apparently were significantly losing the DSP format "wars." My bet is that if Lexicon still exists at all, it is in the recording studio and in actual movie theaters. Bipoles work, and they work well, but you must dedicate your entire sound system to that concept. It ends up being quite expensive (Lexicon was/is not cheap even by *my* standards). AND... your room must lend itself to at least four bipoles, equally spaced, down the side of each of your two side walls.

Not for me. My oddball listening room will absolutely not allow that arrangement. And (personal preference here) I just don't care for it all that much.

[#] Thu Jan 14 2016 11:44:34 EST from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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The bipole arrangement ONLY works if your digital soundfield processor


Fair enough. Lexicon is still around, at least as a name that is now owned by Harman, but they are selling pro-grade *cinema* processors... not for home use, except by the obsessed... oh, and the words "bipole" and "dipole" do not appear in the manuals anyway... I'm not sure what exactly the soundfield processing is supposed to do, to optimize for a bipole.


but if no receiver on the market does that thing... clearly we are talking about vince-q's personal opinion! ;-)

This is like a <200sqft room... 12x12 or 13x13 feet?

[#] Thu Jan 14 2016 11:50:27 EST from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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This is like a <200sqft room... 12x12 or 13x13 feet?

also, acoustically pretty damp, if not "dead." carpets and couch and bookshelves occupy a large proportion of surface area.

[#] Thu Jan 14 2016 13:14:47 EST from vince-q @ Cascade Lodge BBS

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2016-01-14 08:50 from LoanShark @uncnsrd (Uncensored)
This is like a <200sqft room... 12x12 or 13x13 feet?

also, acoustically pretty damp, if not "dead." carpets and couch and

bookshelves occupy a large proportion of surface area.



"Dead" is not a bad thing. Ideally you want what we physics nerds call an "anechoic" environment (no echoes).

That way, the entire digitally synthesized soundfield, generated by your speaker system, will be as close to ideal as possible.

Incidentally, back when Lincoln Center (Avery Hall) first opened in the 1960s, they had to completely re-do the walls - Lenny almost had a heart attack over the echoes! "Get RID of them!" So they did. It's still not anechoic, but it is far far better than when originally tested.

The Academy of Music (Philly) is about as close to perfect as one can hope to find outside of an Acoustics textbook. And believe me (from experience in that hall) it is! Magnificent.

--Me

[#] Fri Jan 15 2016 07:18:21 EST from fleeb @ Uncensored

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Acoustics is an interesting science.

Asheville, NC has a cathedral where the choir sings in a loft above the parishoners, projecting their voice onto a ceiling that acts as an acoustic lense, focusing their sound down to the crowd.

Problem is, the choir can't hear themselves as clearly, heh.

[#] Sun Jan 17 2016 03:46:53 EST from vince-q @ Cascade Lodge BBS

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"In the old days" (Pre Vatican II) most Catholic churches, at least in the NJ/PA/NY region, were structured that way.

[#] Sun Jan 17 2016 10:40:40 EST from zooer @ Uncensored

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CHOIR???!   I thought those singing voices were angels !



[#] Tue Jan 19 2016 10:30:31 EST from fleeb @ Uncensored

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We were not angels. Oh no.

[#] Wed Jan 20 2016 14:31:39 EST from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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Heh, anyone remember darkstar?

Definitely not an angel.

[#] Fri Jan 22 2016 11:18:59 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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put them at the 110degree ideal, quite. Might be able to get close, at

about 90 and 90 if I put them on new shelves or rearrange storage bins


I had to do mine at 90 and 90 as well, because the room is oblong and the "screen" is on the longer wall. My surrounds are attached to the ceiling and aimed down at the main seating area. The result is not as good as having them back a little, but it's way better than not having them at all.

[#] Fri Jan 22 2016 14:05:17 EST from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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the "screen" is on the longer wall. My surrounds are attached to the

ceiling and aimed down at the main seating area. The result is not as


What speaker model did you use - I assume something that's designed to wall mount, not a typical bookshelf speaker

[#] Fri Jan 22 2016 18:06:44 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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These speakers are an entry level Polk Audio model (RM6000) that have since been discontinued. They have the threaded mounts built in on the back so I was able to mount them with a set of aftermarket brackets.

[#] Sat Jan 23 2016 11:45:27 EST from vince-q @ Cascade Lodge BBS

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2016-01-22 08:18 from IGnatius T Foobar @uncnsrd (Uncensored)
put them at the 110degree ideal, quite. Might be able to get close,

at

about 90 and 90 if I put them on new shelves or rearrange storage
bins


I had to do mine at 90 and 90 as well, because the room is oblong and

the "screen" is on the longer wall. My surrounds are attached to the

ceiling and aimed down at the main seating area. The result is not as

good as having them back a little, but it's way better than not having

them at all.


Agreed. I have been to many friends' homes with that arrangement and it really did surprise me at how well it does work.

Most of the modern "theater controller" boxes (the Yamaha Avantage line is only one of several - I recommend them, also Onkyo) will support "rear center" - not actually necessary but those who have done that (not me) tell me the result is noticeable and good.

I just don't feel like spending another 6 grand to run 1 effects speaker (all my pre-amps and amps are now "fully employed"). <evil grin>

[#] Sat Jan 23 2016 11:47:04 EST from vince-q @ Cascade Lodge BBS

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2016-01-22 15:06 from IGnatius T Foobar @uncnsrd (Uncensored)
These speakers are an entry level Polk Audio model (RM6000) that have

since been discontinued. They have the threaded mounts built in on the

back so I was able to mount them with a set of aftermarket brackets.



1. the best thing you can say about Polk speakers you already own is "they've been discontinued." Since Polk has since moved firmly to the entry-level consumer-grade market, at least "they don't make them any more" gives you a reasonable shot at them actually being GOOD.

[#] Sun Jan 24 2016 23:16:01 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Looking for some advice from the A/V geeks here.

I've been tasked with replacing the video projector in our church with a new one that is high-definition and 16:9 aspect ratio.

The existing projector is 1024x768 and connects with a very long VGA cable.
As part of a renovation they're going to remove the roll-down screen and build a new screen directly into the wall, so it's time to replace the projector as well.

What's the "right" way to run digital video over long distances? I'm guessing it's probably about 200 cable feet from the projector mount to the computer in the booth. Can you run HDMI that far, or is there a better way? (Ethernet?
Fiber?)

(We'll talk about choosing a projector too, but first I want to solve the cable problem.)

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