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[#] Tue Jan 05 2021 10:37:50 EST from Nurb432

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Lol, i was trying to do that too back in the 80s. but trying to find a way to distill music down to use compact wave tables then reproduce it like a synth. Basically converting music to sheet, then running that thru a player.  Not at all practical or the same, but it was an idea.

Another was a bank of sram chips in a device the size of a boom box.. simple A/D then D/A  ( in effect just capturing wav files ) but considering the ram size of the day,you get a few minutes of music for a lOT of money spent.  ( and a backpack battery :) )

 

 

 

Mon Jan 04 2021 13:22:54 EST from IGnatius T Foobar
After a bit of research, i discovered that ironically back in the 80s
i was trying to make what we now call e-ink. Just didnt have a name,

History is littered with inventions that simply weren't yet possible with the technology available at the time. By that standard, Leonardo da Vinci invented the helicopter, and I invented the MP3 player.

da Vinci knew how the helicopter would fly, but he didn't have a way to power it.

My 1986 conceptualization of an MP3 player was based on early experimentation with digitized audio on my Commodore 64 (which as many of you know, had a volume control that could be hacked to play 4-bit waveforms). What we didn't have at the time was the storage density required to make it portable. I imagined that music would be distributed on ROM cartridges.

Italian geniuses, you just can't keep us from inventing stuff that isn't buildable yet :)

 



[#] Tue Jan 05 2021 17:02:55 EST from IGnatius T Foobar

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"HELLO EVERYONE. IT SURE IS NICE TO BE HERE TODAY. I AM SAM, THE SOFTWARE MOUTH FOR THE COMMODORE 64 COMPUTER."


[#] Tue Jan 05 2021 21:58:00 EST from ParanoidDelusions

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This has a completely different connotation in 2021 than it did in 1983. 

Which is a sad commentary on the human race. 

1983 - "Wait... one day we'll be able to talk to our machines?" 

2021 - "Wait... one day we'll be able to..." 

 

Tue Jan 05 2021 17:02:55 EST from IGnatius T Foobar

"HELLO EVERYONE. IT SURE IS NICE TO BE HERE TODAY. I AM SAM, THE SOFTWARE MOUTH FOR THE COMMODORE 64 COMPUTER."

 



[#] Wed Jan 06 2021 05:02:51 EST from nonservator

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"Why yes, older female friend. As someone who grew up watching Star Trek, I would love to be able to talk to my computer and have it talk back. IF I COULD TRUST THE GOD DAMN THING NOT TO NARC ON ME TO THE OLIGARCHS OF SILICON VALLEY"



[#] Wed Jan 06 2021 10:11:10 EST from ParanoidDelusions

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Cortana Will Be In Halo 5: Guardians- Attack of the Fanboy

Wed Jan 06 2021 05:02:51 EST from nonservator

"Why yes, older female friend. As someone who grew up watching Star Trek, I would love to be able to talk to my computer and have it talk back. IF I COULD TRUST THE GOD DAMN THING NOT TO NARC ON ME TO THE OLIGARCHS OF SILICON VALLEY"



 



[#] Wed Jan 06 2021 13:26:56 EST from IGnatius T Foobar

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This raises the question, why hasn't anyone built a digital assistant that only does what its owner tells it to do?

[#] Wed Jan 06 2021 14:41:28 EST from Nurb432

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They have ( google, amazon, etc ). Problem is, you are not the owner...  But its doing exactly what its owner wants it to do.

Wed Jan 06 2021 13:26:56 EST from IGnatius T Foobar

This raises the question, why hasn't anyone built a digital assistant that only does what its owner tells it to do?

 



[#] Wed Jan 06 2021 15:50:25 EST from zooer

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Big tech knows what you want more than you do.



[#] Wed Jan 06 2021 17:28:57 EST from darknetuser

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2021-01-06 13:26 from IGnatius T Foobar

This raises the question, why hasn't anyone built a digital assistant

that only does what its owner tells it to do?



There are a bunch of FOSS digital assistants in the making, but afaik they are academic projects for the time being at best. I think the most promising one was called "Mycoff"?

[#] Wed Jan 06 2021 17:36:22 EST from IGnatius T Foobar

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They have ( google, amazon, etc ). Problem is, you are not the
owner...  But its doing exactly what its owner wants it to do.

Agreed, but you know what I mean.

You'd think that by now there would be, at the very least, a crowdsourced digital assistant with auditable software, whose sole owner/operator is its end user, and only performs operations commanded by the end user. It isn't even all that difficult to do. There are callable web APIs to do just about everything you could want. You could build the software on a desktop computer and then deploy it on a Raspberry Pi with a microphone and speaker attached to it.

I'd even add an activity indicator to show when it's "doing something". Frequent software audits would prove that the indicator can be trusted.

[#] Wed Jan 06 2021 18:01:26 EST from ParanoidDelusions

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I think there is something like this. 

What is that maker site that has DIY projects? The name escapes me right now. "Build your own Alexa with a RPi". 

https://lifehacker.com/how-to-build-your-own-amazon-echo-with-a-raspberry-pi-1787726931

 

Wed Jan 06 2021 17:36:22 EST from IGnatius T Foobar
They have ( google, amazon, etc ). Problem is, you are not the
owner...  But its doing exactly what its owner wants it to do.

Agreed, but you know what I mean.

You'd think that by now there would be, at the very least, a crowdsourced digital assistant with auditable software, whose sole owner/operator is its end user, and only performs operations commanded by the end user. It isn't even all that difficult to do. There are callable web APIs to do just about everything you could want. You could build the software on a desktop computer and then deploy it on a Raspberry Pi with a microphone and speaker attached to it.

I'd even add an activity indicator to show when it's "doing something". Frequent software audits would prove that the indicator can be trusted.

 



[#] Thu Jan 07 2021 17:04:30 EST from Nurb432

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:)

 

As others have mentioned there are a few oss projects, but the ones i have seen still use services like google behind the scenes.

But via, it should be doable on a small scale. Would need some decent AI accelerated hardware tho. 

Wed Jan 06 2021 17:36:22 EST from IGnatius T Foobar
Agreed, but you know what I mean.

 



[#] Thu Jan 07 2021 17:35:31 EST from ParanoidDelusions

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The problem is, to make an agent meaningful, you need to be able to predict what the person is going to want. To do that, you've got to store tracking data.

So, DuckDuckGo doesn't have a personal assistant, because they would have to keep tabs on you in order to implement one.

To have one locally, you would have to manage the tracking, locally. It would *still* be a security risk, but at least you would own and manage the hardware the security risk would live on.

 

Thu Jan 07 2021 17:04:30 EST from Nurb432

:)

 

As others have mentioned there are a few oss projects, but the ones i have seen still use services like google behind the scenes.

But via, it should be doable on a small scale. Would need some decent AI accelerated hardware tho. 

Wed Jan 06 2021 17:36:22 EST from IGnatius T Foobar
Agreed, but you know what I mean.

 



 



[#] Fri Jan 08 2021 07:11:55 EST from Nurb432

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Right, you would need local storage to go along with the AI. But if its under your local control, its not that much of a risk.



[#] Sat Jan 09 2021 00:05:09 EST from ParanoidDelusions

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I'm a pretty smart guy. You guys should pay more attention to what I say. What if I'm not actually behind you... what  if I'm *ahead* of you?

Fri Jan 08 2021 07:11:55 EST from Nurb432

 But if its under your local control, its not that much of a risk.



 



[#] Sat Jan 09 2021 13:54:13 EST from Nurb432

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Not zero risk..  but far reduced risk. Nothing is ever 100% but you can force it down to needing physical access to cause trouble.

Run your AI locally on dedicated hardware. Database locally, on those same isolated machines. Its all your hardware, your training.  Don't give it any direct access to the internet. ( ya, training will take longer )

If you want to include some sort of search engine to track your searches start using something like yacy. 



[#] Sat Jan 16 2021 16:28:20 EST from IGnatius T Foobar

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Do keep in mind that different people have different levels of trusting/mistrusting the cartel. There are a lot of people who are willing to let Google cookie them, but are not willing to have a microphone listening to their home around the clock. Those are the people for whom it would be sufficient to have a device that they simply can be confident is not speaking to the cartel except when spoken to by the owner/user of the device.

So it could be a different device, or the same device running at a different privacy setting. At the lowest privacy setting it allows cookies and searches Google and maintains logins to things so you can say things like "Where's my stuff?" and it checks your online orders. At the highest privacy setting it throws the cookies away and searches DuckDuckGo, so you can have it read things aloud to you and it will probably still be useful for media; there's no reason you need a cookie for it to answer requests like "Play me some Coltrane" and have it connect to Youtube or Spotify and search for the music you asked for.

Home automation would be the interesting part. The protocols and standards seem to be converging so that seems like it could work pretty easily.

[#] Tue Jan 19 2021 08:27:12 EST from Nurb432

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Re-converging.. *cough*x10*cough*   ( and ya i still use that.. go figure. that qualify as retro? :) )

Sat Jan 16 2021 16:28:20 EST from IGnatius T Foobar

Home automation would be the interesting part. The protocols and standards seem to be converging so that seems like it could work pretty easily.

 



[#] Sun Jan 24 2021 18:51:47 EST from IGnatius T Foobar

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I had X-10 for years. It was tied in to the computer along with everything else. I even had it set up so that you could pick up any phone in the house and switch on/off any light in the house by dialing the right code. I retired most of it when we moved, but some of it comes back out every year when we put up the Christmas lights.

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