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[#] Mon May 13 2024 22:27:29 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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Dunno whether this ought to be in the *ix room or in the programming room, but whatever...

Today I came to the realization that ever since NPTL was merged into glibc some ~20 years ago, it's no longer necessary to specify "-lpthread" when compiling a multithreaded program. I tried it and it worked fine. I looked at the library on disk and, sure enough, it's just a null library that is only there to keep build scripts from breaking.

I was about to remove "-lpthread" from my published Makefiles but then I stopped to consider, it might still be required on non-Linux systems. FreeBSD in particular looks like it has several different implementations of POSIX Threads to choose from (why?) and you have to specify "-lpthread" to make it link that one, or you can specify one of several others.

Am I correct about that? If you try to use POSIX Threads library calls on BSD and don't link a threading library, will it fail to link?

[#] Sat May 18 2024 14:31:52 EDT from darknetuser

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Am I correct about that? If you try to use POSIX Threads library
calls on BSD and don't link a threading library, will it fail to link?




I think it will fail, but then I have not experimented with that in a while. I still have not so old memories of forgetting to add -lpthread and have the build failin my face.

[#] Sat May 25 2024 14:36:19 EDT from Nurb432

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New GhostBSD release. I should try it again. Tried that long ago, dismal failure ( i forget why, but was nothing but frustration )

 

( its essentially a desktop centric flavor of FreeBSD, not a fork, designed to optionally hide the complexities of real FreeBSD from newbies.  Or the lazy, like myself.  )



[#] Sun May 26 2024 10:29:14 EDT from Nurb432

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Officially back from the dead:

 

"The Damn Small Linux team has released Release Candidate 4 (RC4) for DSL 2024! This update brings a series of improvements focused on user experience, administrative tasks, and international accessibility.



[#] Wed May 29 2024 16:58:46 EDT from darknetuser

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2024-05-26 10:29 from Nurb432
Officially back from the dead:

 

"The Damn Small Linux team has released Release Candidate 4 (RC4) for

DSL 2024! This update brings a series of improvements focused on user

experience, administrative tasks, and international accessibility.


I had heard that work on DSL had resumed a good while ago.

Nowadays I use Tiny Core Linux instead. Suffices to say that TCL was born when the current DSL developper stabbed the guy who ended up leaving and creating TCL. TCL is cool because they have some in-house projects in order to keep their system bloat free.

[#] Wed May 29 2024 17:08:35 EDT from Nurb432

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I think it was last year when i read about it first, but having an official release this year means its really alive and not a 'flash in the pan' rebirth.

Used to carry DSL on a CD and a usb stick in my 'harddrive toolkit bag', for recovery use in the old days.  Switched to "system rescue"  when DSL went away . ( the bag also had  adapters for both sizes IDE, scsi, sata, later m.2 too.  was used when friends got new drives, and needed to copy stuff, or toasted their install and needed help. )

Wed May 29 2024 16:58:46 EDTfrom darknetuser
I had heard that work on DSL had resumed a good while ago.
 

 



[#] Wed May 29 2024 17:23:27 EDT from darknetuser

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2024-05-29 17:08 from Nurb432
I think it was last year when i read about it first, but having an

official release this year means its really alive and not a 'flash in

the pan' rebirth.

Used to carry DSL on a CD and a usb stick in my 'harddrive toolkit

bag', for recovery use in the old days.  Switched to "system
rescue"  when DSL went away . ( the bag also had  adapters for both

sizes IDE, scsi, sata, later m.2 too.  was used when friends got new

drives, and needed to copy stuff, or toasted their install and needed

help. )

I also have a System Rescue DVD in every one of my work locations. I don't have a toolkit bag, I just have a kit in each place I work at. I carry enough stuff on me as it is :)

That said, I never found microdistributions to be very good for resucue and repair. They don't have much stuff in them, and I much prefer to have something compact (like a CD or thumbdrive) that has a bit of everything than something that just has the basics.

What microdistributions shine for is creating custom solutions. If you need a laser-focused system you can put a Tiny Core Linux remaster togetther very quickly that will include only the stuff necessary for the job. You will be able to run your remaster in a toaster and it will be run blazing fast anyway.


System Rescue is golden because it has a very hackable boot process. You can use it as a poorman's service provisioner and everything. System Rescue can be programmed to download a script via http and execute it upon boot... with a creative ussage of a custom http application you can supply instructions to System Rescue you are booting without hyaving to interface with your recovery DVD directly. Fucking neat.


I source most of my recovery media from Linux and ADMIN magazine lol.

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