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[#] Tue Aug 08 2017 14:09:22 EDT from bennabiy @ Uncensored

Subject: Reservation..

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So would that be the reservation expanding its tent-pegs?



[#] Thu Aug 17 2017 10:43:47 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

Subject: Re: Reservation..

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That's kind of what I'm getting at here. At times, making something "unix-like" can be at odds with making it maintainable by non-gurus. Is it ok when Apple does it but not ok when Red Hat or Ubuntu does it? People have been trying to get the best of both worlds for decades (remember linuxconf?)

[#] Thu Aug 17 2017 17:05:40 EDT from bennabiy @ Uncensored

Subject: Re: Reservation..

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Agreed.



[#] Fri Aug 18 2017 10:29:18 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

Subject: Re: Reservation..

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I was hoping for some thoughts from Ragnar, who is a fan of both the Apple system *and* the "unix-like" way of doing things. Clearly they are at odds with each other. Was it ok for Apple to break from tradition, but only Apple because they serve a different area of computing than, say, RedHat or Debian?

[#] Fri Aug 18 2017 11:22:42 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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Back on that topic, I think I solved my systemd problem. Basically, systemd thinks it knows whether your service is running or not; it can be wrong. If your service was invoked directly from the init script, it doesn't know it's running when it is; if the start script fails, systemd will think it's running when it isn't; if the stop script fails, it may think it's not running when it is. Etc. In either of those states, the "stop" or "start" command may do nothing at all, by itself, because systemd thinks there's no state transition that needs to happen.

It's all a bit boneheaded, but there are ways to deal with it.

[#] Fri Aug 18 2017 18:24:08 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Do you control the start script or is it third party software? What I've found is that a lot of systemd start scripts are built as naive ports of sysvinit scripts -- maybe they were even auto-converted -- and they don't really take advantage of systemd.

Specifically: the script will have a start command, a stop command, and monitoring instructions, and the service still runs in the background, because that's how it was done under sysvinit. But if you instead write the script to have systemd start the service in the *foreground* then there's nothing to monitor.
When the service exits, either normally or abnormally, the kernel reliably tells systemd that the process ended; there's nothing to detect.

Obviously I loved this when I saw it because I used to have a habit of running services directly out of /etc/inittab this way, and was very frustrated when I couldn't rely on /etc/inittab being available anymore.

[#] Sat Aug 19 2017 02:31:08 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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Well, it works either way. Your service can fork itself into the background... usually (though as pointed out in my last message, not always) systemd will be able to track its status in the background via cgroups.

sysvinit scripts are directly supported, and that's what we're using (and it's our script, at this point.) What I did was make the "stop" command try a little harder if its first attempt to stop the service gracefully fails, it will kill -9

[#] Wed Aug 23 2017 12:05:45 EDT from Ragnar Danneskjold @ Uncensored

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I'd have more problems with OSX if it weren't geared towards the desktop....
It's pretty rare you need to get that deep into the system.

[#] Fri Aug 25 2017 20:07:19 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

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2017-08-18 11:22 from LoanShark @uncnsrd

Back on that topic, I think I solved my systemd problem. Basically,
systemd thinks it knows whether your service is running or not; it can

be wrong. If your service was invoked directly from the init script, it

doesn't know it's running when it is; if the start script fails,
systemd will think it's running when it isn't; if the stop script
fails, it may think it's not running when it is. Etc. In either of
those states, the "stop" or "start" command may do nothing at all, by

itself, because systemd thinks there's no state transition that needs

to happen.

It's all a bit boneheaded, but there are ways to deal with it.


[Service]
Type=forking
PIDFile=[path to your PID file]
[...]

If your service creates a PID file, systemd will use the file specified by PIDFile to track whether or not the service is actually running, rather than trying to chase forks in a daemonizing process.

https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/7/html/System_Administrators_Guide/sect-Managing_Services_with_systemd-Unit_Files.html

So, if your service can be told to create a PID file, that should help significantly.

If not... well, I dunno how you dealt with it in sysvinit.

[#] Sat Aug 26 2017 19:06:12 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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And that's why I'd love it if systemd became universal, at least for Linux ... instead of all the tedious mucking about with pid files, you could just run the program without forking into the background, systemd will spawn the process directly and can respond to it exiting.



[#] Sun Aug 27 2017 23:22:45 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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It's universal enough though, right? It's now the default on both Ubuntu and RedHat-derived systems.

[#] Mon Aug 28 2017 12:13:27 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

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Honestly, if I didn't have to deal with older distributions, I'd stop doing the whole daemonization thing and just run it as you might run any command on a command line.

Hrm... although, honestly, I could do both. I could take a command line argument that would daemonize if needed...

[#] Mon Aug 28 2017 13:34:59 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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It's universal enough though, right? It's now the default on both
Ubuntu and RedHat-derived systems.

Hmm. According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Systemd#Adoption_and_reception it has been the default on CentOS, Debian, Fedora, Mint, SuSE, Red Hat, and Ubuntu for some time now (plus some others that I'm not counting as anything other than fringe players).

The question of course is: "as a software distributor, should I write exclusively to systemd?" I'm starting to think the answer is "yes" because anyone still running sysvinit in 2017 is probably already dealing with being a fringe player.

[#] Wed Aug 30 2017 10:54:47 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

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Heh... well, I'm having to deal with ancient distributions, so I still have to write for sysvinit, upstart, and pretty much anything else.

Detecting which init tool the distribution uses is a new kind of entertainment.
In the sense that amputation of major limbs is entertaining.

[#] Thu Aug 31 2017 14:30:48 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Right, and that's supposedly why every init-replacement at least *tries* to support sysvinit scripts. But it still feels sort of emulated and second-class.


[#] Wed Sep 06 2017 12:23:41 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

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I figured one had to support sysvinit for backwards compatibility.

I could have taken the easy approach, and just written sysvinit scripts and said 'screw it'. But... I really do want our software to start more dynamically than sysvinit might permit.

[#] Sun Sep 10 2017 17:01:47 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Last year, Snoracle announced that there would be no Solaris 12, but instead Solaris 11 would be updated forever (rolling release cycle, just like everyone else is doing these days).

Now, they've just announced that "Solaris 11.NEXT" (stupid name) won't be released this year; it'll be released in 2018. Maybe. They've also been laying off people in the Solaris and SPARC groups.

Are we at a point where we can call Solaris and SPARC a "legacy platform" yet? Rather than answer that question from an emotional-attachment point of view, let's try it this way: would anyone in their right mind deploy a *new* workload on Solaris or SPARC today?

[#] Mon Sep 11 2017 10:51:20 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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Possibly an Oracle server, but not any inhouse-developed code.

(I'm stretching here.)

[#] Mon Sep 11 2017 12:52:27 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Well sure, that's a trend that we're seeing with a number of vendors now (Oracle, IBM, Microsoft) if the customer is deploying [vendor] operating system it is because they're using it to run [same vendor]'s own server software.

The next step is "oh geez, it's just not worth it, we'll pick other software" (H-pukes is there now).

[#] Mon Sep 11 2017 14:29:22 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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For those who haven't seen it or tried it yet...

[ https://guacamole.apache.org/ ]

Guacamole is an access server that requires nothing but a web browser to connect to the RDP, VNC, SSH, Telnet sessions of your choice. One might expect this to be slow and clunky, but it's actually *really* good. It's more responsive than even some non-browser-based clients.

I'm using it now, in fact :)

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