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[#] Sat Jan 16 2021 07:30:53 EST from Nurb432

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I dont see it changing anything.  You still hit the 'services' and login, buy stuff, etc. They need to gather information on you to be functional.   Unless you get every company to agree to purge data on logout, and they wont, its doing zero for you.

If you dont want to leave a 'useful' trail, you can do that today.

 



[#] Sat Jan 16 2021 07:32:13 EST from darknetuser

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2021-01-15 15:04 from ParanoidDelusions
https://www.indiatimes.com/technology/news/tim-berners-lee-wants-to-tu

rn-the-internet-on-its-head-and-decentralize-it-once-more-353998.html?

fbclid=IwAR02P6ewMZ7Cw8hUGf9fvPeS-NzTRk89TUesyj3r8g2FISf8Ye74xLgBQjo


Have you guys heard anything about this? 

 


I have heard, but I don't know if it is a workable model.

If anything, the Internet has been gravitating out of federated services instead of the other way around.

[#] Sat Jan 16 2021 07:33:11 EST from darknetuser

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2021-01-15 15:49 from nonservator
Solid looks to me like the end of anonymity for anyone engaging, and

the ability of others to pull your plug at any time.


I agree over the anonimity concerns.

Pull-the-plug is harder if you are hosting your own pod, but that is troublesome in other ways.

[#] Sat Jan 16 2021 07:42:10 EST from darknetuser

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2021-01-15 18:39 from ParanoidDelusions
Elaborate. How does having your own wallet and deciding who to let

plug into it, on a one time basis, erode your anonymity - as compared

to now... where Facebook and Twitter and Google have it all stored on

their servers and have cookies tracking you where ever you go? 


What are your privacy concerns about this idea? I haven't thought

that deeply about it yet. Just a general, "sounds good... imma ask

the guys who really care about this stuff what they think..." 


For one, in order to use a service, you need to tell it where your Pod is so they can connect to it. That alone makes it hard to use Solid-powered services in an anonymous way - for example, from perfect-opsec Tor navigation.


Also, your activities would be associated with an unique ID that you would be giving to them. Twitter and Google and Facebook can generate an advertisement profile from you crossreferencing cookies and whatever, but it is still hard for them to properly track what you do if you follow some simple practices. If you are forced to use the single unified ID they can still use cookies ADN the unique ID.

I think the idea has merit but it falls short. Also, people would not jump into this model unless a bunch of services people really wants to be in started using it.

I think it is more likely for a parallel Internet to pop up in which you get derouted if you don't follow proper privacy practices, which is to say, I don't think it is likely.

[#] Tue Jan 19 2021 13:17:02 EST from IGnatius T Foobar

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It sounds like the goal is simply decentralization, not anonymity.  That's a separate task and it doesn't have to be done as part of the same effort.

The big important existential goal right now is to remove the cartel's power.  Nothing else matters.



[#] Tue Jan 19 2021 16:29:06 EST from Nurb432

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I donno about that, i think both are important.  Staying anonymous will become more important as they start reaching out and slapping people down personally. Its already started. 

Not being known may keep you out of the FEMA camps. 



[#] Tue Jan 19 2021 17:08:15 EST from IGnatius T Foobar

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You will have to give us a report after it cooks for a bit.

So it's been a little over a week now, and I am still delighted.  This little router is outstanding.

I see that the router software has their "CAPsMAN" software on board.  Does that mean I can buy a few of their wifi access points (some of which are also cheap-as-chips) and the router I already have will act as a controller for them?  I could use a system like that but I am really not interested in investing in Ubiquiti type stuff.  But for $20 per access point and a controller I already appear to own, it would be worth it.



[#] Tue Jan 19 2021 17:32:42 EST from Nurb432

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Cool ill add it to my list of 'things to consider when needed'  instead of cheap commodity routers.



[#] Tue Jan 19 2021 21:52:57 EST from ParanoidDelusions

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Agreed. I couldn't get my mind around how to word it, though. 

I mean, how does Bitcoin work to anonymize transactions? If it can be done there, there should certainly be a way to do it here. My understanding of bitcoin is that if you're not hacker-level careful, a transaction will expose your identity, anyhow. 

We need to make anonymous transactions bonehead safe. I know that is a tall order - but - your grandmother needs to be able to do it confident that she won't accidently reveal her identity if she doesn't maintain a clean system that boots from a USB image every time she logs in under the anonymous account. 

That is the problem with things like i2p. I understand that my traffic is going out encrypted through a tunnel to decentralized peer routers with i2p and why this buys me anonymity. But if I'm doing it on my regular machine on my regular OS - there is a chance I'll make a mistake, copy and paste things, enter something in the wrong window. So the safest way is a boot CD or a USB drive that is either non-writable or cleaned every boot - that is a hassle regular people are never going to accept. 

As long as it remains the province of only the most technically adept - it is never going to be big enough to disrupt what is in place. But modular components that don't have everything necessary, but create pieces that help toward solving the puzzle - are probably a good way to start moving in that direction - even if they're not perfect. 

 

Tue Jan 19 2021 13:17:02 EST from IGnatius T Foobar

It sounds like the goal is simply decentralization, not anonymity.  That's a separate task and it doesn't have to be done as part of the same effort.

The big important existential goal right now is to remove the cartel's power.  Nothing else matters.



 



[#] Wed Jan 20 2021 08:28:30 EST from Nurb432

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Technically, it doesn't as it was never designed to. Other blockchain based currencies do however. 

 

Tue Jan 19 2021 21:52:57 EST from ParanoidDelusions



I mean, how does Bitcoin work to anonymize transactions? If it can be done there, there should certainly be a way to do it here. My understanding of bitcoin is that if you're not hacker-level careful, a transaction will expose your identity, anyhow. 

 

 



[#] Fri Jan 22 2021 10:38:23 EST from darknetuser

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I mean, how does Bitcoin work to anonymize transactions? If it can be

done there, there should certainly be a way to do it here. My
understanding of bitcoin is that if you're not hacker-level careful,

a transaction will expose your identity, anyhow. 

Bitcoin does not anonymize or obfuscate transactions. That is a myth. It is out of the design parameters and goals.

You can perform Bitcoin activities anonymously if you take special precautions, but that is like browsing the www. You can do it anonymously but it was not designed for it.

[#] Fri Jan 22 2021 10:43:51 EST from darknetuser

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That is the problem with things like i2p. I understand that my

traffic is going out encrypted through a tunnel to decentralized peer

routers with i2p and why this buys me anonymity. But if I'm doing it

on my regular machine on my regular OS - there is a chance I'll make

a mistake, copy and paste things, enter something in the wrong

window. So the safest way is a boot CD or a USB drive that is either

non-writable or cleaned every boot - that is a hassle regular people

are never going to accept. 

Something I have learnt is that there is no fixing stupid when it comes to opsec.

My boss once made me encrypt his laptop because EVERYTHING IN IT MUST BE SUPERSECURE. Nowadays, I often find his laptop unlocked in some unatended table or counter.

The thing was programmed to lock itself if unattended for 5 minutes speficially to address this scenario, but boss disabled it because it was inconvenient.

I think like three weeks later, somebody accessed that computer and found out he is fucking some lady that is not his wife.

Bottom line is you can develop a secure protocol, and then people will missuse it and then blame you for making something that does not work. Akin to running Tor Browser, signing up with your real name on a forum, and then complaining because the SJWs found you.

[#] Fri Jan 22 2021 13:21:20 EST from ParanoidDelusions

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At the place in Ohio, I made us implement pushed strict security for mobile devices. I hung out with all the executives from a sister company, and we would go out to clubs and bars, and everyone had their Motorola out on the bar, spinning it around, checking texts, drinking... every night, as they got completely blasted - all of them with no security on them. 

The physician who owned our company bitched righteously about how inconvenient it was and how necessary it was in his role as a physician (a gynecologist) to have quick access without needing to enter some complex secure passcode to his mobile device. 

"What are you doing down there, Doc? Taking notes about what you see on your blackberry?" 

Anyhow - he went on some exotic vacation to Africa - and his phone was stolen. He came back in a panic. Can you wipe it remotely? 


"Sure - we set that all up... and if it EVER becomes active on a domestic US carrier again, our wipe command will be queued and processed instantly on access. As long as it is in Africa, though - no dice..." 

*eyeroll*

 

Fri Jan 22 2021 10:43:51 EST from darknetuser
That is the problem with things like i2p. I understand that my

traffic is going out encrypted through a tunnel to decentralized peer

routers with i2p and why this buys me anonymity. But if I'm doing it

on my regular machine on my regular OS - there is a chance I'll make

a mistake, copy and paste things, enter something in the wrong

window. So the safest way is a boot CD or a USB drive that is either

non-writable or cleaned every boot - that is a hassle regular people

are never going to accept. 

Something I have learnt is that there is no fixing stupid when it comes to opsec.

My boss once made me encrypt his laptop because EVERYTHING IN IT MUST BE SUPERSECURE. Nowadays, I often find his laptop unlocked in some unatended table or counter.

The thing was programmed to lock itself if unattended for 5 minutes speficially to address this scenario, but boss disabled it because it was inconvenient.

I think like three weeks later, somebody accessed that computer and found out he is fucking some lady that is not his wife.

Bottom line is you can develop a secure protocol, and then people will missuse it and then blame you for making something that does not work. Akin to running Tor Browser, signing up with your real name on a forum, and then complaining because the SJWs found you.

 



[#] Sat Jan 23 2021 08:36:18 EST from Nurb432

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We dont let people take their devices overseas.  We give them burners with even more security than normal. 



[#] Sat Jan 23 2021 12:04:35 EST from ParanoidDelusions

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Yeah - as the owner of the company, which *was* a SMB - he kind of operated outside of my policies. 

He also used to bring in his family laptops, drop them down on my desk, and go, "Um, so this is my son's laptop. He says it isn't running quite as fast as it used to, seems sluggish and isn't as reliable. Have one of your guys look at it... can you have it ready by the end of the day?" 

I started threatening to bring my wife into the office, drop her down on his desk and go, "So um, listen - this doesn't feel like it used to. Things don't seem as... efficient. Have one of your guys take a look at it, see if they can tune it up. Can you have it ready by the end of the day?" around the office where I was sure people who would run back and tell him would overhear. 

As mentioned previously, he was a gynecologist, if that wasn't clear. 

Anyhow, family PCs stopped coming into the office. 

 

Sat Jan 23 2021 08:36:18 EST from Nurb432

We dont let people take their devices overseas.  We give them burners with even more security than normal. 



 



[#] Sat Jan 23 2021 12:53:51 EST from IGnatius T Foobar

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We dont let people take their devices overseas.  We give them
burners with even more security than normal. 

Yeah. No connectivity except through VPN, all physical ports disabled, no physical storage. There are places where if you are anyone even remotely important you can expect to be spied on.

[#] Sat Jan 23 2021 14:35:25 EST from Nurb432

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They are also physically destroyed on re-entry. 

These folks are prime targets. Elected government officials mostly. ( Not all, but mostly )

Sat Jan 23 2021 12:53:51 EST from IGnatius T Foobar
We dont let people take their devices overseas.  We give them
burners with even more security than normal. 

Yeah. No connectivity except through VPN, all physical ports disabled, no physical storage. There are places where if you are anyone even remotely important you can expect to be spied on.

 



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