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[#] Fri Aug 29 2014 09:50:46 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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It's ok, I learned vi on Xenix as well. Yes it's true, we learned the One True Editor while logged in to a Microsoft product. It's nothing to be ashamed of. Back then they had the one unix that was accessible to mortals, and they intended to push it into the mass market. Too bad that was scuttled [https://uncensored.citadel.org/readfwd?go=Skeptic%20Tank?p=882354635]


and they set foot firmly on the path of evil.

[#] Mon Sep 01 2014 08:21:24 EDT from fleeb

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Hm.

I think I learned vi on a VAX machine, and an Amiga 500.

Vim really does port well to all kinds of platforms.

[#] Mon Sep 01 2014 11:46:42 EDT from zooer

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I used VAX/VMS but I don't remember the editor.

[#] Mon Sep 01 2014 11:53:09 EDT from fleeb

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I can't be sure I used vi on that machine... but I know I used it on an Amiga.

[#] Mon Sep 01 2014 17:11:05 EDT from dothebart

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Mon Sep 01 2014 11:46:42 EDT from zooer
I used VAX/VMS but I don't remember the editor.

do you still remember howto change directories? ;-)



[#] Tue Sep 02 2014 22:23:22 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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I remember MicroEMACS on the Amiga ... << cringe >>

[#] Fri Sep 05 2014 00:20:48 EDT from ax25

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The latest Amiga OS is just Emacs.



[#] Fri Sep 05 2014 07:16:20 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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For the last decade or so, "Amiga" has just been a brand name that keeps getting sold and passed around, and attached to any interesting product launch to which its owners want to attract attention. The true Amiga technology has been dead for two decades. Way ahead of its time (or perhaps right on time, but the mainstream was stuck in the stone age because of a well-entrenched status quo) but all of that technology has long since been absorbed into the state of the art.

[#] Fri Sep 05 2014 08:38:22 EDT from fleeb

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This is true, concerning Amiga.

I think the OS is now targetted towards embedded devices, but it has lost much of its charm with the advances made since then.

[#] Tue Mar 10 2015 00:01:46 EDT from ax25

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That was the un-post



[#] Wed May 11 2016 16:52:47 EDT from the_mgt

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Due to the fact that the Illusion kept me busy and entangled me with work, I came late to the party myself: Kult, the pen and paper RPG, got a new iteration:

http://kultdivinitylost.com (Partially NSFW and in some cases not safe for your mind.)

There was also a kickstarter, which I totally missed. But everything is looking very interesting.



[#] Sun Aug 11 2019 13:16:21 EDT from darknetuser

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Is anybody here concerned because the prices of boardgames are skyrocketing? Seriously, you can buy a shotgun for the prices some game publishers are charging.

[#] Mon Aug 12 2019 13:39:38 EDT from Haven

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The tariffs have raised prices, and prices were already going up.   A decade back Fantasy Flight proved that people would by a $60+ game, if the components were worth it.   Since then we have seen some games shoot up to $100 or more.   There are a number of reasons for this, better components usually play a big part.  

 

I did the kickstarter for The Fantasy Trip, and backed it at the "I Want it All" level, which ended up being $120, but the box it came in is huge.  Like 26 lbs huge.   



[#] Tue Aug 13 2019 10:17:01 EDT from darknetuser

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Tariffs maybe hitting for sure.
Also, lots of people getting into crowdfunding without knowing what they are backing. Have you heard of the drama regarding that Barrage game from Cranio?
What I find concerning is that there is a lot of effort poured to components but I feel I am running out of options regarding the cheap games. Carcassone used to be way cheaper than it is.


I am glad I still have the old glories on my shelves to play.

[#] Tue Aug 13 2019 13:25:21 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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I call bullshit on the tariffs. I have a friend who published a board game a few years ago, and China only charged him a couple of bucks a piece for a game he sold at $30. A publisher who raises the price of a game from $60 to $100 isn't doing it to cover manufacturing costs.

[#] Wed Aug 14 2019 08:35:06 EDT from Haven

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Tue Aug 13 2019 13:25:21 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar
I call bullshit on the tariffs. I have a friend who published a board game a few years ago, and China only charged him a couple of bucks a piece for a game he sold at $30. A publisher who raises the price of a game from $60 to $100 isn't doing it to cover manufacturing costs.

Who is raising the cost of games from $60 to $100 due to tariffs?   

When I have seen games go up in price it is because the quality of components goes up.  As an example, the game Frag from Steve Jackson Games when first published was a $30 game.  When Frag! Deluxe came out it was a $60 game.  Why did it double in price?  In the original it was cardboard figures, and a paper map.  In Deluxe it was plastic figs, and a thick double sided cardboard map, character sheets, and dry erase markers.  So the price increase was due to the increase in quality of the components, and extra components.  Now granted, Frag! is out of print, and the tarrifs are new, so your friend, and my friends that publish games might not have seen the prices go up, since this just happened this year. We wouldn't see increases in costs till around right about now anyways.   So a game published a few years ago with games in the pipeline, might not show an increase till Q3 or Q4 of this year.  

The original Ogre game from Steve Jackson Games was a $4 game.  The Designer's edition was $100.   SJG made no money on the Designer's edition kickstarter, the cost of each box was right around the $100 mark, it should have been much more expensive, but no one would have bought it at a higher price.   The re-release of Ogre 6th Edition, I think runs around $60.  The original came with paper figures that you cut out  The 6e comes with cardboard 3D tanks that you punch out instead.  Again an increase in quality of the components, and size of components.   

As far as Kickstarter goes, this is the risk you take investing in a product.  This is no different than the stock market.  It is legalized gambling.   I back kickstarters by either people I know, or companies I know.   So far I have had a single Kickstarter not deliver on what was purchased.   So I am out $$60 on that one.  I backed that project at $85, I got the graphic novel, but none of the extras that I wanted.  So for my $85 I got $25 retail worth of product.   

I have backed around 60 Kickstarter projects, some of them by established game companies, some by newer game companies.  That doesn't mean that established companies do it right every time.  Take a look at Palladium and the Robotech game, they didn't fulfill their Kickstarter promises before losing the license.   However as I said, it is legalized gambling.   

Kickstarter has become a way to offset all the preproduction costs.   

Cheapass Games is still out there, for cheap games.   White Wizard has Star Realms which is a $20 game with lots of replayability.    There are other inexpensive games out there as well.  



[#] Wed Aug 14 2019 10:01:43 EDT from darknetuser

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2019-08-13 13:25 from IGnatius T Foobar
I call bullshit on the tariffs. I have a friend who published a board

game a few years ago, and China only charged him a couple of bucks a
piece for a game he sold at $30. A publisher who raises the price of a

game from $60 to $100 isn't doing it to cover manufacturing costs.

International boards are a bitch. I was not thinking in the US market. Here we get a tax/tariff rise nearly everytime we switch prime minister.
Also, many games are not distributed here so the only shops that carry them actually bougth them from other shops paying the import tax when caught. So yeah, it hits hard.

[#] Wed Aug 14 2019 10:14:42 EDT from darknetuser

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Also, I agree on the Kickstarters not being pre-orders, which is what most people wants them to be. What bother me a bit is that many publishers are using Kickstarters specifically as preorder platforms, which distorts the original purpose of said platform.
As for components rising the costs, sure. But I would argue that many games see high increases in price with no noticeable component improvement. Carcassone, which is still cheap, saw a 40% increase in a single year. Many Eurogames are not twice the price they were 5 years ago with the same components.
My point is that the tendency is for games to become less affordable, be it because components become more expensive of that publishers just want it
.

[#] Sat Aug 17 2019 19:35:01 EDT from darknetuser

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This makes me wonder: are there good Agricola replacements out there? You know, a worker placement game with a stressful sense of needing to acomplish certain task (like feeding your family) under pressure. I keep wanting to give Agricola a try, but it is out of print in my language. Caverna looks nice, but I am totally not playing a game in which you can eat your donkeys lol.


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