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[#] Wed Sep 04 2019 09:51:44 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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"content" is a word chosen to turn creative work into an exchangeable commodity.

[#] Wed Sep 04 2019 10:24:47 EDT from darknetuser

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Yeah, it is weird. I write for various firms and they don't call my stuff "content". They call them "articles", "columns", "novels" or whatever they are.

[#] Wed Sep 04 2019 21:56:33 EDT from ParanoidDelusions

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Absolutely. I am the "content creator," they own exclusive license to use the content I create any way they want, and I get paid ONCE for it, no matter what. That is how it works.

[#] Thu Sep 05 2019 10:05:41 EDT from darknetuser

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I used to work with book publishers, which work a different way. You are basically paid per sale. You may get a forward pay if you are a big name but that is about it.
I have basically stopped writing books precisely because of how badly the whole thing works. And because I don't feel supported by the friends and the public, but that is another matter.

[#] Mon Sep 09 2019 01:14:28 EDT from ParanoidDelusions

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Thu Sep 05 2019 10:05:41 EDT from darknetuser
I used to work with book publishers, which work a different way. You are basically paid per sale. You may get a forward pay if you are a big name but that is about it.
I have basically stopped writing books precisely because of how badly the whole thing works. And because I don't feel supported by the friends and the public, but that is another matter.

I have a couple of friends who have self-published eBooks and seem fairly happy with the results they achieved - but it seems like an awful lot of work. 

 

 



[#] Mon Sep 09 2019 09:09:13 EDT from darknetuser

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I have a couple of friends who have self-published eBooks and seem
fairly happy with the results they achieved - but it seems like an
awful lot of work. 


My experience after being there and being at conventions and knowing people in the industry:
If you want to have your books read, you need to be able to make them, distribute them and advertise them. Self-publishing platforms usually just disribute them, which means they don't cover enough of the process and that is why most self-publishing crashes hard.
You can make self-publishing _sorta_ _kindda_

_somehow_ sell your books, but the return of investment for your time is so bad that you WILL get depressed if you make the numbers.
I suspect self-publishers that manage to sell more than 100 books per year are either a) publishing tonnes of books that are equal to each other, so selling a copy of each a month compensates for the year b) have friends that support them a fucking lot.
I know I sound very negative, but fact is, every next guy is publishing or self-publishing a book. If you release a book now, it will be lost in a sea of millions of books. No matter how good it is, you are not making it known alone. And you are not gonna make it known with help most likely.
See, I have sacrificed important things to get my books self-published and sold, and you usually don't realize when you are in it. But now I know better. It is really not worth it. Unless you are in it only for the ego trip of having a professional printed copy in your house.

[#] Mon Sep 23 2019 10:33:46 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar

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Self publishing seems like the kind of thing you do just because you have something to say, not because you're going into the process looking to make a lot of money.

Famous authors can probably get away with it, but I suppose if you're that famous you can get favorable terms from a publisher.

[#] Thu Jan 16 2020 20:32:18 EST from IGnatius T Foobar

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"Table Stakes"

That seems to be the new buzzword; I'm hearing it everywhere. It means what it sounds like it means (when used as a buzzword), the needful which must kindly be done before a discussion or project may be permitted to begin.

On that note, I've noticed that "kindly do the needful" has declined. I suppose the people who use it have become aware that the rest of us lampoon it.

[#] Mon Jan 20 2020 14:30:47 EST from Ragnar Danneskjold

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I've noticed that every company has a peculiar vernacular that spreads throughout.


It became readily apparent when I left my data center job and came back for a meeting about a year later.

People in the meeting had adopted some newspeak, and I had no idea what they were talking about.

Now that I'm about and about with more customers, it's even more stark.

[#] Mon Jan 20 2020 23:26:54 EST from wizard of aahz

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Letting you speak to customers is a terribly worrying thought.

[#] Thu Jan 23 2020 16:21:18 EST from Ragnar Danneskjold

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Yeah, fuck those assholes.

[#] Wed Feb 12 2020 08:51:32 EST from wizard of aahz

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I thought there was some sort of buffer that had been built specifically to stop you from speaking to customers.

[#] Wed Feb 12 2020 11:24:37 EST from Ragnar Danneskjold

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2020-02-12 08:51 from wizard of aahz
I thought there was some sort of buffer that had been built
specifically to stop you from speaking to customers.



Yeah, they're called salespeople. But when they over commit, someone has to be the grown up and take the heat.

[#] Wed Feb 12 2020 14:16:44 EST from wizard of aahz

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If they didn't over commit, I think I'd faint.

[#] Thu Feb 20 2020 14:26:55 EST from IGnatius T Foobar

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"wrapped around the axle"

I've heard that more in the last two weeks than ever before. It must be "trending"