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[#] Sun Sep 18 2011 10:02:29 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Poor Adobe, they have the nicest little platform-in-a-box and the rest of the industry is always ganging up on them to try to eliminate it.

[#] Sun Sep 18 2011 22:23:11 EDT from wizard of aahz @ Uncensored

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Sig - I got it as a freshman in college. Guess that explains our age differences.

[#] Tue Sep 27 2011 16:21:21 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

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Poor Adobe, they have the nicest little platform-in-a-box and the rest

of the industry is always ganging up on them to try to eliminate it.

It must be pretty good, everybody knows you can't get the good tech win.
Although I've never looked at it myself, from what little I heard years ago, it was pretty unpleasant to write for.
But maybe things have changed.

[#] Thu Sep 29 2011 09:44:48 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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So ... is everyone following the "UEFI secure boot" drama? Will Microsoft succeed in coercing OEM's to build computers that can only boot Windows? At the moment they're still pushing the "it is the OEM's decision whether to allow secure boot to be disabled" but we know they lie through their teeth; they are probably doing all sorts of secret dealings under the covers that will have secure boot switchable at first but non-switchable in a couple of years.

And we all know that OEM's don't really have the ability to make "decisions" when there are millions of dollars in kickbacks from Microsoft on the line that depend on doing things Microsoft's way.

I wonder how long it will be before DVD Jon publishes Microsoft's signing key.

[#] Fri Sep 30 2011 05:25:27 EDT from the_mgt @ Uncensored

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To me, this sounds like the TPM jadda jadda from some years ago. Seems that nobody uses it, only a few manufacturers even built them into their boards and only some linux geeks (at least I know only about those) are using the functions.

Personally, I like that Secure Boot feature, but since it is my system under my administration, I want to control the whole key/cert stuff. If they come up with some homebrew stuff, it will be cracked like the bootloaders of the Wii, the PS3, mobile phones and what not. Also I think someone will leak/hack/whatever the master key.

Also, though I don't know any real windows fanboys, I believe that people are not really crazy about getting/installing a new windows. Maybe they can trick in a few gamers with some DirectX 3000 bundled only with win8, but the rest is fed up enough with their win7/vista stuff. So, conclusion: Long before MS will be able to dictate it, Apple will seal their beautiful machines with it, in order to not soil their machines with inferior OSs. 



[#] Fri Sep 30 2011 08:33:28 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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UEFI secure boot actually uses the TPM. The reason it's problematic this time is because Microsoft is requiring OEM's to use it if they want their hardware to have a Windows 8 sticker on it.

[#] Sat Oct 01 2011 14:07:53 EDT from the_mgt @ Uncensored

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But weren't people thinking that the world was going to end, all privacy abolished, all content DRM'ed, etc back when TPM was introduced? And nothing like that happened.

I understand that they could lock out anything else with Secure Boot, but major companies like Dell, etc. are those companies that sell laptops without preinstalled Windows right now and I think they know why. They could easily say No to some OEM deal forcing Secure Boot. MS might be desperate and they might have some more raving lunatics like this Elop guy on board of their burning oil rig, but I really doubt they will be able to force this to the mass market.

In their subnotebook/netbook OEM spec they defined that 12" display and 1gb ram is the maximum in order to get their cheap winxp (home) licenses. So manufacturers shipped with 1gb ram, but also with an additional slot to put on 2gb more ram. Problem solved, they will do something similiar with Sec. Boot: make the board "Secure Boot Ready" but they won't activate it. 



[#] Sun Oct 02 2011 10:18:15 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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The big hullaballoo with TPM was that someday, consumers wouldn't have a choice between "trusted computing" and doing what they want with their own hardware.
In the meantime, Microsoft built a media player that uses what they call "secure" media paths involving signed drivers and a handshake with the TPM, while the rest of the world simply used YouTube.

UEFI Secure Boot means that "someday" is now coming very soon. This is the scenario they warned us about in 2003, that we would eventually be faced with hardware that can only boot a "trusted" operating system, despite the wishes of the hardware's owner.

It may even be the reason why the RIAA has been less aggressive in recent years. Microsoft and Apple may have told them "relax, we are exterminating software that is capable of piracy."

Oh, and forget about Hackintoshes; Apple will be all over this even more than Microsoft.

[#] Sat Oct 22 2011 11:54:37 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Nokia announced this week [http://labs.qt.nokia.com/2011/10/21/the-qt-project-is-live/] that they have completed spinning Qt out into its own open source entity.
Although they will continue to provide funding and programmers, Nokia and non-Nokia contributors will be on equal footing.

This is a good thing. I'm willing to bet that someone inside the company knows that Nokia will eventually get assimilated into Microsoft, so they want to make sure Qt does not become a Microsoft product as part of that process.

(hmm ... Skype is a Qt app, isn't it?)

[#] Sat Oct 22 2011 14:04:32 EDT from the_mgt @ Uncensored

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Didnt they do something similiar with some version of Symbian earlier? Then they closed it down and you could get the open source code via CD copy and had to sent patches alongside Permit A38 (only with the blue form!!!) as well as a copy of your blood type sent to the transilvanian embassy?

As much as I like my Symbian^3 (Anna) phone,  I find their politics confusing.



[#] Sun Oct 23 2011 03:07:09 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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I don't know about Symbian, but Qt is bound by that contract they made with the KDE community years ago that says if the source ever gets closed (including due to company acquisition etc) then the most recent published version automatically forks to a BSD-licensed copy or something like that.

And of course Qt is released under the GPL nowadays, isn't it?

But yes, I do agree that Nokia has a habit of acting inconsistently and erratically.
There are probably a lot of different factions in that company with different attitudes. And it's probably a good guess that there are people in that company who know that Elop is a servant of Redmond and they need to make sure that important assets like Qt can't be used to hurt the free world.

Even if you're not a KDE user (and I am not) -- Qt remains an excellent way to write cross-platform applications, and it must not fall into Microsoft's hands.

[#] Sun Oct 23 2011 07:44:25 EDT from dothebart @ Uncensored

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otoh, I like the Idea of mono getting swapped away by a c-carpet qt binding...



[#] Tue Oct 25 2011 20:29:28 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Aren't there already C# bindings for qt? it would seem that this is the most sensible way too late portable applications in the first place.

[#] Wed Oct 26 2011 22:51:48 EDT from Ladyhawke @ Uncensored

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Not so sure Mono would consider that a fair trade!



[#] Fri Oct 28 2011 02:09:54 EDT from TheOneLaw @ Uncensored

Subject: I found this by google - hint hint.....

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Thu Sep 29 2011 09:44:48 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored
So ... is everyone following the "UEFI secure boot" drama? Will Microsoft succeed in coercing OEM's to build computers that can only boot Windows? .....

 

Well, the way things are proceeding it could be prognosticated that Microsoft will probably get this implemented

 but with the outside-the-american-borders growth in linux it will only be economically-suicidal or niche market

 manufacturers that would actually implement this without leaving a hardware jumper backdoor or whatever.

 

The growth in linux usage is huge outside the american borders,

not that any media will ever admit to that.

 

Added to that is the old 'necessity is the mother of invention' meme

 - someone will probably crack that problem anyway, if not for spite then maybe just for fun.

-- 
TheOneLaw



[#] Tue Nov 01 2011 14:36:34 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

Subject: Re: I found this by google - hint hint.....

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The growth in linux usage is huge outside the american borders,

I'm interested in hearing more about that.

Is desktop Linux heading towards the mainstream outside of the corporate-run USA? How fast and how much?

[#] Tue Nov 01 2011 14:39:44 EDT from zooer @ Uncensored

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I have heard that also.  A lot of foreign governments are turning to Linux to avoid license fees and save money.  Corporate America can't break free of Microsoft's grip yet.



[#] Tue Nov 01 2011 15:27:01 EDT from skpacman @ Uncensored

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I'm just waiting for the day when the USA realizes there are better, more secure, and more flexible, options for operating systems waiting out there if they just look and keep an open mind about it.

I've changed my entire home to nothing but Linux boxes (either Ubuntu, Debian, Slax, or Android). The only thing in my house that isn't linux-based, is my wife's phone (it's BREW based... damn cheap-o verizion phone).

It's the closed-minded-ness of corporations and businesses that puts them in the M$ license loop. They invest so much into software that they barely have money left over for decent hardware or other expenses. I'm pushing a movement at my place of work to get completely away from the grip of M$ and move into "cloud" computing and non-platform-specific workflow.

A lot of what we do now is in a browser to a web server on-site. our email is gmail based (though i pushed for them to use Citadel, but meh). the only thing that's holding us back is our ERP system and our design software.



[#] Wed Nov 02 2011 03:57:44 EDT from the_mgt @ Uncensored

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Here in germany, the city of Munich tried to move to Linux completely: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LiMux

There are a few other towns of which I have forgotten the name.

These are my personal observations over the last ten years or so: 

In general, I know only people who try linux for their private desktop computers and most of them are geeks, nerds and the like. Even at the university, most students use windows (brilliant move of MS, the MSDN-AA system, you get your win7 for free and need to pay "only" for the Office suite...). Only CI students use linux more often, but the profs use windows mostly. If a CI student who uses linux meets a non-CI student using linux, (s)he is surprised. Some computer pool rooms here at the university have linux installed, but the ones with windows machines are always under heavier usage.

Yesterday I handed out some papers in the cafeterias of the university and lots of students have iphones (second might be android), also lots of the students own some kind of tablet pc. Macs are common too, since they are hip (and apple sells them slightly cheaper to students). 

Servers on the other hand are often linux based in university networks, but they are fire&forget systems in the smaller departments. Once installed, seldomly maintained/upgraded. The same goes for small businesses. But the more specialized they are, the more bound to windows they are, often in need of a mssql server. Architects with their CAD software and other planning tools, dentists with their special needs for protocolling peoples mouths, psychologists with their need for SPSS and other mathematical and special equipment. Specialized software in general is expensive, odd and quite crappy when it comes to usability and migration. People in city planning departments suffer from the same problem. (I work or have worked for all of the above, only half of them run linux server and only 1/6 of them have people with extended knowledge of windows/linux systems working for them).

The only thing I know for sure is, that almost nobody here uses windows os on mobile phones. And if he does, he hates it and/or is laughed at by others.

So the only place were linux is really widely used is in network operating centers, webpage hosting/housing centers, etc. I think I don't know anybody running a windows server with IIS on it.

And mostly only people working in hardcore IT business use any flavour of linux.



[#] Wed Nov 02 2011 22:15:35 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Unsurprisingly, the growth of the Linux desktop footprint is happening in lockstep with the decline of desktop software in general. When software is written so that it runs anywhere (such as inside a browser) then it doesn't matter what the OS is.

I'd like to see Google offer an entire Android stack that runs inside Chrome.
That would bring a vast array of small apps to every platform, and combat Microsoft's "Metro" effort.

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