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[#] Mon Aug 11 2014 08:25:25 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

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Hmm... I'll look into that. That doesn't look familiar.

Fiddly, getting the right command line arguments.

[#] Mon Aug 11 2014 10:30:29 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

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Hmm... I get why -fPIC is needed, and I suspect that's the problem.

Adding it, though, leads to several undfined symbols from C++ (e.g.: _Unwind_Resume).
I note these seem to be undefined within the C++ lib file, which suggests it expects *someone* to provide these, but I'm not sure who.

I could probably work around the problem by creating something to link into everything that just defines all of these as void*... but that feels wrong to me, like I'm missing something else to which I should pay attention.

Well, it's something with which to play.

[#] Mon Aug 11 2014 16:42:07 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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I note these seem to be undefined within the C++ lib file, which
suggests it expects *someone* to provide these, but I'm not sure who.


libgcc_s I believe.

[#] Tue Aug 12 2014 08:37:59 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

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I did find it in libgcc_eh, which is hidden away in the bowels of the folders somewhere, but the compiler seems to defy including it.

I may try playing with this later. I have something that works, even if it isn't my ideal.

I think I've been trying to work through Linux issues for about a month now, when I was hired to work on Windows, just because the Linux guy we have doesn't seem eager, willing or perhaps capable of looking into this kind of stuff.
But I have a Windows bug I've discovered that I need to address... a nasty crash exposed by doing something our students will commonly do.

(And, yeah, I recognize the first problem is that they're using Windows, but this is a class... we sorta have to let them discover the ways in which Windows sucks, and you can't really do that without Windows).

[#] Tue Aug 12 2014 11:46:03 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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I did find it in libgcc_eh, which is hidden away in the bowels of the

folders somewhere, but the compiler seems to defy including it.

think you need to link with g++ -shared in order for it to happen automatically.

[#] Tue Aug 12 2014 12:36:11 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

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I did try to link with g++ instead of gcc, but that lead to some other kind of problem... it complained that it could no longer find -lgcc_s, even when I went to the trouble of explicitly adding the path that it already knew about.

[#] Tue Aug 12 2014 16:00:00 EDT from dothebart @ Uncensored

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strace is your friend once more.



[#] Tue Aug 12 2014 23:58:12 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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and gcc -v or whatever it is that prints the linker command line when it's invoked by the driver.

It's fairly clear that there are some compatibility bugs with respect to this version of gcc and the underlying system library setup...

[#] Wed Aug 13 2014 08:23:29 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

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Heh, well, if it turns out to be a compiler bug, it isn't getting sorted.
It's an older compiler, and I don't really feel like digging into its code to correct it (if there's a problem).

Working through a Windows problem that isn't terribly easy to see. I'll come back to this when I can.

[#] Wed Aug 13 2014 09:49:31 EDT from dothebart @ Uncensored

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its simply to clue you up how the g++ calls the linker, and do it the way its right on your own afterwards.



[#] Wed Aug 13 2014 12:01:19 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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well, as I recall things could get weird when you start mixing up a libgcc_s with a glibc and libgcc setup that originally had it static. So the compiler may not be set up to deal with that very well if at all...

[#] Thu Aug 14 2014 09:16:28 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

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"Maybe rebooting will work."

The actual Linux developer here. He reboots Linux machines almost as if he were a Windows developer.

[#] Thu Aug 14 2014 11:11:54 EDT from dothebart @ Uncensored

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rebooting / turning off & on again helps if you have bugs with uninitilized values in your software - the memory is flushed and you therefore have a bigger probability they're initialized to 0...

Elseways sometimes if you've got trouble with drivers of i.e. wlan hardware this may help also.

but usually you only masquerade your error further by doing so.

Re-boots are for testing whether upgrades were power-failure and thus reboot safe.



[#] Thu Aug 14 2014 11:48:41 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

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Normally, stopping and starting a service/daemon can accomplish what one seeks to do with a reboot, in my experience, regardless of whether you're working in Windows or Linux.

If we did more work within the kernel, I might understand the rebooting a bit more. And, perhaps, that's why I find his behavior a tad odd... he was a kernel developer, now finding himself in the application space, and accustomed to reboots as a way to clean everything up.

[#] Fri Aug 15 2014 08:48:17 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

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I may find myself trying to resolve this sooner than expected.

The code mostly works, but occasionally has a weird permissions problem when attempting to get a shared memory object for which the permissions were set appropriately for all to read and write.

I suspect a conflict between the libc required for our shared object, and the libc required for whatever executable that runs in our instrumented shell.
The only way to resolve that will be to ensure our shared object is statically linked.

Ugh.

[#] Fri Aug 15 2014 10:10:41 EDT from vince-q @ Cascade Lodge BBS

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The code mostly works, but occasionally has a weird permissions
problem when attempting to get a shared memory object for which the
permissions were set appropriately for all to read and write.

Hmmmm... is it possible that instead of 'rw-' you may need 'rwx' ??

Just a thought...

[#] Fri Aug 15 2014 10:22:58 EDT from vince-q @ Uncensored

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Hmmmmm.....

Then there's always

-rw-rw-rw
File Permissions of the Beast!

[#] Fri Aug 15 2014 13:07:17 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

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Heh... it's already the permissions of the beast. It's permissions on shared memory, though, from which nothing will be executed, so it shouldn't need 'x' permissions. And, normally, it works... just not in this environment with my perhaps funky compiler thing.

[#] Mon Aug 18 2014 14:22:49 EDT from zooer @ Uncensored

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To our German Freunde, there is an discussion on G+ weather Munich is getting rid of Linux and going back to
Windows. Does anyone know for sure?

[#] Mon Aug 18 2014 15:34:49 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Munich was a high-profile Linux success story. If they're switching to Windows, it's pretty obvious that not only are they getting Windows for free, but someone there is getting millions of euros in kickbacks from the evil empire.

We kicked Germany's ass once. Perhaps we need to do it again.

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